Course Descriptions

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (BIOL)

BIOL 210   Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology (4).  The first of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method.  Emphasizes cellular structure and physiology, molecular evolution, classical and molecular genetics, and biochemistry.  May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 202.  Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  Corequisites or Prerequisites: CHEM 201 and 201L.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 150.

BIOL 211  Introduction to Organismal and Population Biology (4).  The second of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method.  Emphasizes physiology, development, diversity of life, evolution, and ecology.  May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 201.  Counts toward the fulfillment of the Lower division General Education Requirement in Physical Universe and Its Life Forms.  Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 210.

BIOL 215  Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (3).  The design and analysis of biological surveys and experiments.  Includes hypothesis formation, experimental design, statistical analysis and presentation of results.  Three hours of lecture.  May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for BIOL 315 or BIOL 360.  Corequisite:  BIOL 215L.

BIOL 215L  Laboratory in Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (1).  Hands-on experience in design of surveys and experiments in biological sciences and their subsequent statistical analysis.  Involves extensive use of computers for statistical simulation and analysis.   May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 360.  Prerequisite or corequisite:  BIOL 215.

BIOL 352  Genetics (4).   Detailed study of classical transmission, molecular quantitative and population genetics. Included will be current observations and concepts of the nature, organization, function and regulation of the expression of genetic material. Subject matter covered includes mechanisms of genetic conveyance, recombination, mapping, mutation and repair, RNA and DNA viruses, karyotyping, human genetics, and genetics of organelles. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 309. Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 211.

BIOL 353  Comparative Animal Physiology (4).   A comparative survey of physiological adaptations including gas transport, metabolism, temperature and dehydration tolerance, and locomotion.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 345.  Recommended, but not required: BIOL 360; can be taken concurrently.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 210 and 211.

BIOL 355  Molecular Biotechnology (4).   In-depth treatment of the fundamental molecular techniques in use in the field of biotechnology. Designed to give hands-on experience as well as conceptual background in biotechnological methods.  Subjects covered will include: nucleic acid isolations, vectors, cloning, library screening, hybridizations, PCR, sequencing, sequence analysis and bioinformatics, and transgenic organisms. Other subjects will vary to reflect current practice and developments in biotechnology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 211.

BIOL 356  Cellular Biotechnology (4).  In-depth treatment of the fundamental cellular techniques in use in the field of biotechnology.  An overview of the drug discovery process is presented together with theoretical and practical aspects of specific technologies. Included in lecture/laboratory instruction are the physiology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, culture of bacterial, plant, insect and mammalian cells, genetic engineering and expression systems, hybridomas, fermentation and scale-up technology, separation technology, protein, purification, and immunochemistry.  Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 210 and 211.

BIOL 357  Foundations of Biotechnology (2).  A review of biotechnology applications and product development in the life science industry.  Topics will include: 1) the process of bringing a product to market from concept to sales; 2) laws, regulations, ethics, and social issues pertaining to the discovery, development, testing, manufacturing and commercial distribution; 3) skills of technical writing, Standard Operating Procedures and documentation for regulatory, quality assurance, and intellectual property; and 4) employment opportunities.  Prerequisites: BIOL 210, BIOL 211.

BIOL 358  Computer Skills for Biotechnology (3).  Designed to introduce and explain the application of computational and analytical methods to solve problems in biotechnology.  Many of the popular software tools employed in biotechnology and informatics research will be covered.  The theoretical basis governing the use and importance of these tools will also be explored.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 210, BIOL 211.  Co-requisite: CS 111.

BIOL 367 Biology of Microorganisms (4 ) Presents a comprehensive selection of subjects from the field of microbiology. Students will study prokaryotic structure and function; growth and control of microorganisms; ecology, physiology, and diversity of bacteria; basic microbial and viral genetics, microorganisms of medical and economic significance; and biotechnology and its human applications and societal implications.  The laboratory component will employ research-oriented group activities, in addition to individual projects and assignments, and will engage students in the latest techniques utilized in the field of microbiology.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 210 and 211.

BIOL 377  Immunology (3).  Study of the mammalian immune system at the molecular and cellular level.  Mechanisms of immunology, such as generation of unique receptor specificities, transduction of signals through T and B cell receptors, programmed cell death and lymphocyte selection, regulation of responses by growth factors and cytokines, and cell-cell interactions, are explored.  The course perspectives include historical and technological aspects of modern immunobiology. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 460.

BIOL 489  Introduction to Laboratory /Field Research (2).  A research project in the laboratory or field in collaboration with a faculty member.  May be repeated once for credit or the project may be continued for an additional semester as part of BIOL 499.  Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

BIOL 497  Internship in Biotechnology (4).  Career-related experience in private industry, government agency, and/or public sector.  All participants utilize learning agreements.  A final written report is required.  Students will be supervised both on site and by the course instructor.  The learning agreement must be completed and signed prior to enrollment.  May be repeated for a maximum of eight (8) units, but only four (4) units can be applied toward the major.  Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor prior to registration.

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

CHEM 150 General Chemistry (5).  Introduction to many of the basic qualitative models and principles in chemistry.  The areas covered include:  basic nuclear and atomic structure, the periodic table, covalent and ionic bonding, states of matter, intermolecular forces, energy changes, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, stoichiometry, properties of gases, and chemical properties of the common elements.  The laboratory experiments and projects are designed to complement lecture material and provide real-life applications of chemistry in society. Counts toward the fulfillment of the Lower-division General Education Requirement in Physical Sciences and Its Life Forms.  Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and three hours of laboratory per week.  Recommended:  High School Chemistry.  Prerequisite:  Completion of the Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) requirement.

CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry (3) and CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry (3).  A two-semester sequence designed to introduce the student majoring in science to the properties of organic compounds.  The areas covered are:  bonding, structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, chemical and physical properties of each functional group, acid/base phenomena, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, organic synthesis, and an introduction to spectroscopic structure determination.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 150 for CHEM 201, CHEM 201 and 201L for CHEM 202 with minimum grades of C (2.0) in each.

CHEM 201L Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2).  Laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the basic techniques of organic chemistry and to complement the lecture material covered in CHEM 201.  Six hours of laboratory.  Corequisite:  CHEM 201.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 150 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

CHEM 250  Quantitative Chemistry (3).  Introduces quantitative approaches to chemical equilibria and kinetics.  Fundamental principles of thermodynamics introduced in CHEM 150 are explored in greater depth. Topics include solubility, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and nuclear chemistry.  Applications of these topics to practical chemical analysis are discussed.  Corequisite for chemistry majors only:  CHEM 275.  Prerequisite:  MATH 160, CHEM 202, or consent of instructor.

CHEM 351  Biochemistry (3).   A one-semester introduction to Biochemistry designed for students majoring in science.  The areas covered are:  the structure and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, peptides, and nucleotides as well as biomolecular conformation and dynamics.  May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for CHEM 303.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 202 and CHEM 250 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

CHEM 351L Biochemistry Lab (2).  Designed to complement the lecture material and illustrate the basic techniques of biochemistry.  Six hours of laboratory.  Corequisite:  CHEM 351.

CHEM 352 Biochemistry (3).  Designed to introduce the student majoring in science to principle areas in biochemistry.  Areas which may be covered but are not limited to include:  enzyme kinetics and regulation; generation and storage of metabolic energy; basic crystallography and structure of proteins, molecular modeling, membrane structure and pharmaceutical biochemistry.  May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for CHEM 304.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 351 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or consent of instructor.

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

PHIL 315  Ethics:  Theory and Application (3).  An introduction to ethical theory and applied ethics.  Surveys the major ethical theories developed in Western philosophy, and examines the ways in which theoretical appraches are applied to contemporary personal and social issues.  Study of philosophy is complemented by discussion of intellectual history and exploration of a range of related disciplines such as bioethics, environmental ethics, business ethics, and public policy.

PHIL 340 Ethics and the Environment (3).  A study of recent developments in the field of environ­mental ethics: Examines the moral and ethical status of the natural world. Environ­mental ethics is the attempt to think through issues such as: the proper place of human beings in nature, the extent of our moral and ethical obligations to the natural world, the ethical foundations of pub­lic environmental policy, the princi­ples that govern environmental use and protection, and the legitimacy of various approaches to environmental advocacy. A survey of classical ethi­cal theories will provide context for discussion of environmental ethics, and examination of current environ­mental issues (i.e., the Endangered Species Act, the debate over use of public lands) will serve as a "testing ground" for the practical application of environmental ethical theories.

PHIL 345 Bioethics and Medical Ethics (3).  A survey of ethical issues in biological and medical research and practice. Offers an introductory survey of ethical and moral theory, and investigates application of moral and ethical theory to issues such as animal and human research, the doctor-patient relationship, reproductive technologies and biotechnology.

PHYSICS (PHYS)

PHYS 205 Physics for the Biological Sciences I (4).  A broad coverage of the principles of mechanics, properties of matter and wave motion.  The topics covered include:  Observation and measurement, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, equilibrium, fluids and solids, thermodynamics, oscillations, and waves.  Required for students whose field of study is biology.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.  Recommended:  High school physics.  Prerequisite:  Completion of MATH 160 with a minimum grade of C.

PHYS 206 Physics for the Biological Sciences II (4).  Broad coverage of electromagnetism, optics, and nuclear physics.  The areas covered include:  Electrostatics, electric fields, magnetism, magnetic fields, electric circuits, geometrical optics, optical instruments, nuclear physics, radiation, and spectroscopy.  Required for students whose field of study is biology.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.  Prerequisites:  Completion of PHYS 201 or PHYS 205 with a minimum grade of C in each.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (3).  Introduction to basic concepts, problems, and research methods in the science of psych­ology. Includes perception, cognitive pro­cesses, learning, motivation, measurement, development, personality, abnormal behavior, and biological and social bases of behavior, including cross-cultural issues. The require­ments will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers.

PSYC 461  Neuropsychopharma­cology (3).  An examination of the ways that drugs affect the brain and behavior. Emphasis on psychoactive drugs, including antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics and drugs of abuse. Although social, cultural and political aspects of drug use will be briefly touched upon when appropriate, the primary focus will be neurobiological and behavioral effects of drugs. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or consent of instructor.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ACCT 201  Introduction to Financial Accounting (3).  Introduction to accounting information reported to external users, including the accounting cycle, valuation of assets, liabilities and owners' equity, measurement of net income and reporting of cash flows.  Emphasis is on creation and interpretation of financial statements including required disclosures.  Introduction to the business environment and vocabulary; introduction to ethics and related areas of accounting as managerial accounting, taxation, auditing, and attestation.

ACCT 202  Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3).  Introduction to the accounting information created for internal decision makers.  Includes product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgetary control and incremental analysis.  Focus on strategic cost management to support efficient use of company resources.  Prerequisite:  Completion of ACCT 201 with a "C" or better.

FIN 302  Foundations of Finance (2).  Examines basic aspects of the financing and investment decisions made by financial managers.  Subjects include financial mathematics, net present value, capital budgeting, valuation of financial securities, risk and return, cost of capital, capital structure, and dividend policy.  FIN 302 is designed for the GBM, HTM and SSM Options.  FIN 304 is designed for ACCT and FIN Options.  FIN 302 may not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for FIN 304. Students need to refer to their option checklist for the appropriate introductory finance requirement.  Prerequisite:  All lower-division pre-business core.

HTM 302  Foundations of Production and Operations Management (2).  Introduces the elements associated with the design and operation of a service organization and the integration of these elements within the overall corporate strategy.  Contemporary issues covered include operations in global markets, designing and controlling the service process and planning for operations.  POM 302 is designed for the ACCT, FIN, GBM, and SSM Options.  HTM 305 is required for the HTM Option. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HTM 305.   Students need to refer to their option checklist for the appropriate introductory production and operations management requirement.  Prerequisites:  All lower-division pre-business core and BUS 304.

HTM 411  Database Management Systems (4).  Introduction to data modeling, database design, and database administration. Coverage of the relational database model and construction of a database application using a relational database management system. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisites: All lower-division pre-business core and either HTM 304 or MIS 302 with consent of the instructor.

MGMT 302 Foundations of Management (2).  Important concepts and applications in management including motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organization design, decision-making, communication, and organization change. MGMT 302 is designed for the ACCT, FIN, GBM and HTM Options. SSM304 is required for the SSM option. MGMT 302 may not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for SSM 304.  Students need to refer to their option checklists for the appropriate introductory management requirement. Prerequisite: All lower-division pre-business core.

MGMT 415  Human Resource Management (4).  Effective management of employees in the service sector such as recruitment and interviewing, training and development, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, employee relations, workforce demographics, and employment law. Prerequisites: All lower-division pre-business core and either MGMT 302 or SSM 304.

MGMT 452  Leadership in Organizations (4).   In-depth analysis of the process of leadership in organizations with a focus on the develop­ment of personal leadership skills. Emphasis on students' ability to conceptualize, integrate, and apply diverse approaches to the leadership and motivation of people in organizations. Prerequisites: All lower-division pre-business core, and either MGMT 302 or SSM 304.

MGMT 461 Management in Different Cultures (4).   Examination of the impact of culture on managerial decisions. Key management decisions in a number of industries and countries are examined to highlight the complexities of management in a global environment.  May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for SSM 491G. Prerequisites: All lower-division pre-business core, and either MGMT 302 or SSM 304.

MKTG 302  Foundations of Marketing (2).   Marketing is the process of identifying and satisfying customers' needs for products, services and ideas, and simultaneously creating and delivering a standard of living to society. Examines the components of the marketing process, sources and uses of marketing intelligence, consumer behavior and international marketing. MKTG 302 is designed for the ACCT, FIN, GBM, and HTM Options. SSM 305 is required for the SSM Option. MKTG 302 may not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for SSM 305. Students need to refer to their option checklist for the appropriate introductory marketing requirement. Prerequisite: All lower-division pre-business core.