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CHAD Courses

* Please consult the majors worksheet for a list of required courses for the CHAD major.  Note that not all of the courses are offered each semester.

 

Preparation for the Major

Teenagers gathered next to a buildingPSYC 100 (3) Introduction to Psychology Introduction to basic concepts, problems, and research methods in the science of psychology. Includes perception, cognitive processes, learning, motivation, measurement, development, personality, abnormal behavior, and biological and social bases of behavior, including cross-cultural issues. The requirements will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers.

PSYC 210 (3) Child Growth and Development An introductory survey course that utilizes a chronological approach to examine human development from birth through adolescence. Includes a study of physical development and health; developmental issues of children with special needs; cognitive and moral development; social and personality development; and genetic, sociocultural, and other influences on development.

PSYC 215 (3) Child, Family, Community Study of child and adolescent development within the psychosocial worlds of family, school, and community. Bidirectional effects and interactions among these influences will be explored.  Age, gender, diverse abilities, ethnicity, socioeconomic, and public factors that affect development of values, attitudes, morals, and behavior of children and youth will be considered within an ecological framework.

PSYC 220 (3) Introductory Statistics in Psychology Basic statistical methods for analysis of data in psychology; descriptive and inferential statistics; hypothesis testing; parametric tests of significance. Introduction to linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance; nonparametric techniques. The requirements will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activities.

PSYC 230 (3) Research Methods in Psychology The fundamentals of research methods in psychology. Focus will be on issues of reliability, validity, and ethical considerations in conducting research with humans and animals. Participation in designing and conducting experiments, data analysis and interpretation, and preparation of research reports. The requirements will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 220 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

Upper Division Core Courses

PSYC 331 (3) Infancy and Childhood: Theories and Research Focus on theories, methods, and research in developmental psychology from conception through childhood. Includes biological, genetic, and physical development; social-emotional development, cognitive and language development; perception and brain development. Analysis and synthesis of scholarly articles are integral parts of this course. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, and 230 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Enrollment restricted to PSYC majors and minors and CHAD majors only, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 349 (3) Adolescence: Theories and Research Covers theories, methods, and research in development from early adolescence through emerging adulthood. Includes biological and physical development, social-emotional development, cognitive development, and social influences on adolescent behavior. Focus on analysis and synthesis of scholarly articles and application of theories and methods to the study of adolescence.  Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, and 230 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Enrollment restricted to PSYC majors and minors and CHAD majors only, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 395 (3) Laboratory in Developmental Psychology Advanced research methods in life-span developmental psychology.  Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as cognitive and social development. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and either PSYC 331 or 349 and must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

CHAD 370 (3) Risk and Resiliency in Childhood and Adolescence This course explores the stressful life events experienced by children and adolescents and the ways in which they cope.  The course begins with consideration of theoretical models of stress and coping.  These models are used to address various topics including child abuse, marital dissolution, poverty, homelessness, natural disasters, teen pregnancy, depression, war, and death.   Additionally, positive aspects of stress are considered.  Students gain hands-on experience working in settings that contain children and adolescents dealing with major life stressors. Prequisites: PSYC 100, 331, 349 and PSYC 328 or CHAD 339.

CHAD 491 (3) Children, Adolescents and Social Policy This course explores the role of social policy in children’s and adolescents’ lives.  A main goal for the course is to promote students’ understanding of how social policies shape development and how the current state of families influence policy.  Topics to be covered include child care, education, family values, work and family, legal policies affecting children and adolescents, welfare reform, sexuality issues (e.g., teen pregnancy and sex education) and family violence.  The impact of policies on disadvantaged groups and diverse family types will also be explored.  Prerequisites:  PSYC 210, 215, 331, 349, and 395 or CHAD 496.     

CHAD 496 (3) Observation and Assessment Laboratory Advanced research methods course covering assessments used in research on infants, children, and adolescents, including observation, event- and time-sampling, and standardized tests of social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development. Course will culminate in a written research report on the student’s own empirical study. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, 331 and 349.

Cluster Courses (students choose one course from each cluster)

Cluster A: A typical Child Development

PSYC 328 (3) Developmental Psychopathology  Causes and effects of various psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence are examined from an integrative perspective that addresses biological, genetic, family, social, and cultural influences as well as individual processes including cognition, emotion, attachment, moral development, gender, and sexuality. Diagnoses, treatments, and interventions are covered as well as comorbidities and developmental norms.  Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 331 or 349 must be completed with a C or better.

CHAD 339 (3) Exceptional Children and Adolescents  This course examines the developmental trajectories of exceptional children and adolescents in the contexts of the family, school, and community.  The focus is on disabling conditions and diversity in young people including the causes and characteristics of physical and mental disabilities and giftedness, the identification of individuals as exceptional, and interventions provided for these individuals.  The course includes examination of discrimination and the efforts undertaken to protect the rights of exceptional children and adolescents. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 331 or 349 must be completed with a C or better.

Cluster B: Contexts of Child and Adolescent Development

PSYC 343 (3) Psychology of Work and the Family Focuses on the impact of parental employment on the physical, cognitive, and socioeconomic development of children and adolescents. Subjects will include parental labor force participation, work/family conflict and balance, effects of employment and daycare, and cross-cultural, ethnic, and social class differences. Additionally, the course will address family friendly organizations and how businesses are responding to work-family issues. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230 and 331 or 349 or 356.

PSYC 345 (3) Psychology Caregiving Across the Lifespan  Explores family caregiving relationships and experiences across the lifespan with a focus on the physical, psychological, and emotional impacts on caregivers. Includes critical analysis of the nature of family caregiving and considers how cultural, societal, and global contexts impact how caregiving is delivered. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230 and 331 or 349 or 356. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PSYC 440-1.

CHAD 345 (3) Perspectives on Child Rearing Child rearing takes many different forms depending on the unique characteristics of the children, the parents, and their environments. In this course we examine these different perspectives on child rearing, focusing on parenting over the life span, cultural aspects of parenting, child rearing in special circumstances, issues of day care, parents and children with special needs, and the role of the family in child rearing. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 210 or PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 331 or 349.

CHAD 347 (3) Peer Relationships in Childhood and Adolescence This course considers the reciprocal relationship between children’s and adolescent’s peer interactions and their individual development.  Topics to be covered include how individual characteristics (e.g., temperament, personality, gender), social behaviors (e.g., prosocial behaviors, aggression), and peer networks interact.  Additionally, the course will investigate the roles that families, schools, and culture play.  Consideration is also given to the development and effects of normal and abnormal peer interactions. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 210 or PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 331 or 349. 

Cluster C:  Understanding Others

PSYC 332 (3) Social Psychology Study of individuals and groups as they are affected by social interactions. Subjects include social influence (conformity, obedience), attitudes and attitude change, attraction, altruism, aggression, social perception and cognition, interpersonal influence, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, 220, 230.

PSYC 333 (3) Psychology of Prejudice Examines psychological theory and research on prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping from the perspectives of both the holders and targets of prejudice. In particular, the course emphasizes the cognitive, motivational, and social bases of prejudice, racism, sexism, as well as prejudice reduction. May not be taken by students who have received credit for PSYC 440J. Prerequisite: Psyc 100.

PSYC 336 (3) Abnormal Psychology Causes, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders. Regular visits to local psychiatric facilities may be required. Prerequisite: Psyc 100.

PSYC 341 (3) Multicultural Perspectives in Psychology Theory and research in the study of psychosocial issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, both in the U.S. and elsewhere. Subject matter includes examining the relationship of race, culture, and social class in psychological development and discussing the research implications for the multicultural study of psychology. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 342 (3) Group Dynamics Study of small group behavior and team effectiveness. Examines subjects such as group membership, systems theory, communication, group decision-making, group development and performance, and conflict management. Focuses on diverse perspectives in organizations and work groups. Cross-cultural work settings, and gender differences in leadership and group behavior. Theory and research about group dynamics will be applied to organizational, educational, and counseling settings. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 344 (3) Positive Psychology Examines psychological theory and research on the study of optimal human functioning and what makes life worth living. Focuses on such topics as happiness, strengths, hope, forgiveness, wisdom, and gratitude. Covers core assumptions, measurement techniques, research findings, and practical applications and interventions. Students have the opportunity to evaluate their well-being, strengths, and limitations, and learn ways to apply positive psychology to important domains in their lives and in the lives of the people with whom they interact. May not be taken by students who have received credit for PSYC 440K. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 351 (3) Social Cognition Critically examines the theories, research, and practical applications centered around the basic issue of how people make sense of other people, themselves, and their social environment. Subject matter covered includes attribution theory, schemas and person perception, self-perception, prejudice and stereotyping, nonverbal communication, and social inference. Prerequisites: PSYC 100.

PSYC 356 (3) Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Aging Theories and research in adult development and aging. Includes cognitive, social, psychological, and physical development; vocational and family changes, retirement, successful and unsuccessful adjustment patterns. Issues of gender, social class, and racial/ethnic factors, and their impact on aging will be covered extensively. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

Cluster D: Intrapersonal Development

PSYC 334 (3) Psychology of Personality Theory and assessment techniques in personality research. Subject matter includes study of personality structure, development, personality dynamics, and determinants of personality.  Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 360 (3) Biopsychology Introduction to the biological bases of behavior, including material central to physiological psychology, comparative psychology, behavioral genetics, and sensory psychology. Issues to be addressed include but are not limited to neuroethology, behavioral endocrinology, evolutionary theory, sociobiology, and sensory systems. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, 220, 230.

PSYC 362 (3) Cognitive Processes Theoretical and research approaches to the study of thinking, problem-solving, language, concept learning, decision making and judgment, cognitive development, and cognitive structure. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, 220, 230.

CHAD 365 (3) Socioemotional Development Study of socioemotional development from birth through adolescence viewed through a biosocial perspective. Includes philosophical, historical, evolutionary, psychobiological, and psychological perspectives on the development of emotions, emotional regulation, understanding self and others, empathy, peer relationships, identity, and emotional competence. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

Cluster E: Researching/Working with Children and Adolescents

PSYC 340 (3) Survey of Clinical Psychology Introduction to the field of clinical psychology with an emphasis on the application and evaluation of techniques of individual and group counseling and therapy. Includes methods, diagnosis, research, therapeutic techniques, educational and professional requirements, ethics. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 336.

PSYC 354 (3) Educational Psychology An introduction to psychological research and theory on how instruction affects student learning. Learning, motivation, development, individual differences, psychological aspects of the classroom, and evaluation as related to the educative process. Credit may not be counted toward programs in the College of Education.  Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

CHAD 450 (3) Practicum in Early Childhood Education Examines caregiving and educational settings (background check, TB, and MMR required) for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families, focusing on developmentally-appropriate practices, ethical issues, and legal requirements as they pertain to young children. Students will work at least 45 hours in an appropriate educational setting serving young children and their families. This work will be supplemented by course readings, class discussions, and reflection papers. Prerequisite: Senior standing and Consent of instructor.

PSYC 495 (3) Field Experience in Psychological Settings Supervised field experience in on- and off-campus settings which provide psychological services, such as medical settings, mental health clinics, schools, and industry. Students will spend approximately six hours per week in a field placement for observation and participation, attend weekly class meetings, read related material, and prepare written reports. Application forms must be completed prior to enrollment. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied towad the major. Enrollment Requirement: Nine (9) units of upper-division psychology courses. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor. Specific sections of this course may carry additional prerequisites.

PSYC 498A (1) 498B (2) 498C (3) 498D (4)Independent Study Study plan must be approved by the fourth week of  classes. Individual library study (e.g., review of literature) under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied toward the major. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

PSYC 499A (1) 499B (2) 499C (3) 499D (4)Independent Research Study plan must be approved by the fourth week of classes. Independent research investigation (e.g., empirical laboratory or field research) in collaboration with a faculty member. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied toward the major. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of at least one upper-division laboratory course in psychology.  Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

EDUC 380/HD 380 (3) Applications in Child and Youth Development Considers the social, cultural, cognitive, emotional, linguistic, and behavioral development of children and adolescents from multidisciplinary, multicultural, and applied perspectives. Students will learn major theories of development in order to apply that knowledge to their work in evidence-based services and programs for children and youth. Includes a field experience component through which students will consider how their in-class learning is enacted in the lived experiences of children and youth. Special attention is given to identifying multicultural and socio-cultural influences on development. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for EDUC 496. Students may not receive credit for both EDUC 380 and HD 380.