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Course Descriptions

Descriptions of Coursework, Co/Prerequisites & Units

BIOL 160 (4) Microbiology for Health Sciences

Basic concepts of microbiology, including classification, metabolic activity and the effect of physical and chemical agents on microbial populations. Host parasite interactions, infectious agents, methods of transmission and control are also discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. 

BIOL 210 (4) Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology

The first of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method. Emphasizes cellular structure and physiology, molecular evolution, classical and molecular genetics, and biochemistry. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 202. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 150.

BIOL 211 (4) Introduction to Organismal and Population Biology

The second of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method. Emphasizes physiology, development, diversity of life, evolution, and ecology. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 201. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 210 with grade of C (2.0) or better.

BIOL 321 (3) Human Physiology

A survey of body systems, how they function, and how they can malfunction leading to disease. Includes respiration, nutrition, waste removal, reproduction (including birth), embryonic development, muscular movement, and exercise.

CHEM 150 (4) General Chemistry

Introduction to the basic qualitative models and principles in chemistry. The areas covered include: basic atomic structure, the periodic table, covalent and ionic bonding, states of matter, intermolecular forces, energy, changes, chemical equilibria, acid-base and redox chemistry, stoichiometry, properties of gases, and chemical properties of the common elements. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisite: Completion of the Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) requirement. Recommended: High School Chemistry and/or CHEM 101. Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 150L.

CHEM 150L (1) General Chemistry Lab

Introduction to some of the basic laboratory techniques used in chemistry. The experiments are designed to complement the material covered in CHEM 150. Three hours of laboratory per week. Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 150.

CHEM 201(3) Organic Chemistry

First course of a sequence designed to introduce the student majoring in science to the properties of organic compounds. The entire sequence covers bonding, structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, chemical and physical properties of each functional group, acid/base phenomena, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, organic synthesis, and an introduction to spectroscopic structure determination. Enrollment Requirement: CHEM 150 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 201L.

CHEM 201L (2) Organic Chemistry Laboratory

The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the basic techniques of organic chemistry and to complement the lecture material covered in CHEM 201. Six hours of laboratory. Enrollment Requirement: CHEM 150 and CHEM 150L with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 201.

CHEM 202 (3) Organic Chemistry

Second course of a sequence designed to introduce the student majoring in science to the properties of organic compounds. The entire sequence covers bonding structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, chemical and physical properties of each functional group, acid/base phenomena, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, organic synthesis, and an introduction to spectroscopic structure determination. Prerequisite: CHEM 201and 201L with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

CHEM 202L (2) Organic Chemistry Laboratory

The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate the basic techniques of organic chemistry and to complement the lecture material covered in CHEM 202. Six hours of laboraoty. Prerequisite: CHEM 201 and 201L with a minimum grade of C (2.0) Co/Prerequisite: CHEM 202

CHEM 250 (3) Quantitative Chemistry

Introduces quantitative approaches to chemical equilibria and kinetics. Fundamental principles of thermodynamics introduced in CHEM 150 are explored in greater depth. Topics include solubility, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and nuclear chemistry. Applications of these topics to practical chemical analysis are discussed. Co/Prerequisite: MATH 125 or consent of instructor. Enrollment Requirement: CHEM 150 and CHEM 150L with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

CHEM 250L (1) Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

A laboratory designed to support and illustrate chemical concepts studied in CHEM 250, as well as to introduce quantitative laboratory techniques and encourage analytical thinking. Corequisite: CHEM 250. Enrollment Requirement: CHEM 150 and CHEM 150L with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

CHEM 341 (3) General Biochemistry

A one-semester introduction to the concepts and language of biochemistry. Includes a description of the biochemistry of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, and an overview of cellular metabolism. Intended for science majors, but not for biochemistry and certain biological sciences majors (consult biological science department). May not be substituted for CHEM 351 and/or CHEM 352. Prerequisite: CHEM 201 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

MATH 132 (3) Survey of Calculus

Basic calculus concepts with applications to business, economics, and the social sciences. Differential calculus for algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; optimization, linearization, and other applications of derivatives; introduction to integral calculus. Includes use of graphing calculators. Enrollment Requirement: MATH 115 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

MATH 242 (3) Introduction to Statistics

Types of data, measures of central tendency and variation, visualizing data, counting principles, standard random variables, probability, conditional probability, standard discrete probability distributions, normal probability distribution, tests for normality, sampling distribution, central limit theorem, hypothesis tests for means and proportions, correlation, and regression. May include computer software such as Excel, Minitab, or courseware. Credit may not be counted toward the mathematics major. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed the Entry-Level Mathematics (ELM) requirement. Enrollment Requirement: MATH 115.

PHYS 101 (4) Introduction to Physics I

An overview of the principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The areas covered include: observation and measurement, kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, impulse, and momentum, fluids, heat and temperature, oscillations, and waves in mechanical media. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Enrollment Restriction: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning (B4). Enrollment Requirement: Completion of a course in trigonometry at the high school or university level.

PHYS 102 (4) Introduction to Physics II

An overview of the principles of electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. The areas covered include: electric charge, electric fields, electric potential, DC circuits, magnetism, magnetic fields, geometrical and physical optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Enrollment Requirement: PHYS 101.