Information For

KINE Course Descriptions

Kinesiology, Option in Health Science Course Descriptions

ANTH 301 (3) Culture and Medicine – Healers and Healing Practices

Every culture and society has had to deal with illness and thus has well-developed concepts about the healing process, healers, medical knowledge and healing practices. Offers a cross-cultural exploration of healers and healing approaches. Examines differences and similarities in the ways that people approach illness and healing by relying heavily on an abundance of examples from various cultures, including that of the United States. Examines illness causation and classification theories, diagnostic practices, therapeutic procedures, preventive care, the assumptions that underlie these concepts and practices, and their relationship to the social, cultural, and technological environments in which they are constructed. Focuses on the role of the healer in the context of culture and examines physicians, shamans, witch doctors, curandero/as, midwives, wise men and women and other healers. Explores the use of music, botanicals, healing aids, and pharmaceuticals in the healing process. Informed self-reflection and critical analysis of one’s own world view assumptions and medical belief system are fundamental objectives of the course.

BIOL 177 (4) Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology for Kinesiology I

The first in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in Kinesiology. Taught from a systems perspective students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Includes anatomical terminology, cell and tissue structure and function, basic biochemical and metabolic pathways, nervous system and the senses, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and excretory systems.

BIOL 178 (4) Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology for Kinesiology II

The second in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in Kinesiology. Taught from a systems perspective students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Material includes nervous system and the senses, and the endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Three hours of lecture and three of hours of laboratory.

BIOL 323 (3) The Physiology of Nutrition and Disease

Study of the anatomy and physiology of human nutrition and functional relationships to disease. Includes metabolism, cellular metabolism, digestive physiology, nutrients, enzymes, vitamins, weight management, stress, diet, the role of exercise in nutrition, and the role of nutrition in development. Also covered will be symptoms and effects of disease associated with inadequate nutrition, nutritional contributions to diseases not associated with inadequate diet, and contributions of nutrition to health. Special attention will be given to health concerns of women and the differences in nutritional needs between genders.

CHEM 105 (4) General, Organic, and Biochemistry for Life

Covers the basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry as applied to the biochemistry, pathophysiology, pharmacology and nutrition of human body systems. Intended for students pursuing a degree in a variety of health-related areas such as nursing.

CHEM 105L (1) General, Organic, and Biochemistry for Life Laboratory

Covers the basic principles of weight and volume measurements, solutions, suspensions, colloids, osmosis, energy of biochemical transformations, buffered solutions, the properties of acids and bases and pH balance in the biochemistry of human body systems

KINE 202 (3) Introduction to Physical Education and Kinesiology

Designed for first year and transfer students interested in the physical education profession.  The goals of this course are to aid in the prospective majors in their career choices, to introduce students into fields closely related to exercise and nutritional sciences, to introduce students to current issues in exercise sciences, and to introduce students to key events and concepts in the evolution of exercise science as a discipline and as a profession. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology and Pre-Kinesiology majors.

KINE 204 (3) Techniques and Analysis of Fitness and Weight Training

Knowledge and understanding needed to plan and implement fitness and weight training programs.  Analysis of the development, maintenance, implementation, and self-evaluation of physical fitness. Implementation of methods, techniques, instructional strategies, safety factors, motivation and necessary equipment for teaching physical fitness and weight training. Instruction and techniques in individual skills and strategies in weight training; also includes instruction on stretching for flexibility and injury prevention. Two hours lecture, three hours activity. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors.

KINE 301 (3) Motor Control and Learning

Study of the principles, models and theories of human movement, with an emphasis on the relevance to sport, physical education, human factors and human performance.  Instruction is directed toward understanding the research methods used to evaluate motor control, fundamental principles of motor control, theoretical propositions of human movement control, and applications to movement-intense settings. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Enrollment requirement: BIOL 177, 178

KINE 306  (3) Exercise Fitness and Health

Examines the relationship between an active lifestyle and health and the prevention of chronic disease through positive lifestyle choices. Includes in-depth evaluation of personal fitness levels and dietary intake. (Fulfills GE Area E Lifelong Learning for all students)

KINE 316 (3) Stress Management

This course identifies the physiological, physiological, emotional and behavioral aspects of stress. The body's hormonal and neurological response in times of extreme emotion and the severe health consequences of these responses will be discussed. A variety of stress-reduction techniques and biofeedback methods will be taught and practiced. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors.

KINE 326 (4) Introductory Exercise Physiology

An introduction to the physiology of exercise.   A description of cardiovascular, pulmonary, muscular, endocrine, neural, and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise.  Addresses body composition and clinical exercise physiology.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Enrollment requirement: BIOL 177, 178

KINE 336 (3) Nutrition for Health and Exercise Performance

Applies fundamental biological and nutritional concepts to enhance wellness and athletic performance via nutritional intervention. Students will review current literature and examine products designed to increase performance. Activity and dietary recalls will serve as the basis for individualizing nutritional programs. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors.

KINE 403 (3) Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology

Principles and techniques of construction, organization, administration, interpretation and evaluation of measuring devices used in kinesiology. Includes critical evaluation of data using basic statistical techniques and an evaluation of research design in kinesiology-related studies. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Enrollment Requirement: KINE 204, B4 MATH requirement

KINE 404 (3) Introduction to Epidemiology

This is an introductory course in the basic study of the risk factors for disease in populations. The emphasis of the couse is to understand the methodology of the public health research, and how evidence-based medicine is used to determine optimal treatment in approaches to clinical practice. The course provides instruction in both observational and structured methodologies often used in epidemiological research. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Prerequisite: KINE 403

KINE 405 (3) Health and Drug Education

An examination of the philosophical, ethical, and theoretical foundations of the professional practice of health and drug education in school, community, worksite, and hospital settings. Emphasis on the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems, as well as the role of health and drug education and health promotion in addressing these problems. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Enrollment requirements: KINE 202, PSYC 100

KINE 407 (3) Principles of Health Promotion and Education

This course provides an overview of the breadth of programs and the diversity of settings in the field of health education in health promotion. Explains the importance of health behavior as a contributor to current public health problems and the role of health education and health promotion programs in addressing them. Explores the concepts and skills required for carrying out effective health education programs in a variety of different settings, including school, community, health care, and worksite settings. Also discusses issues of ethical standards and quality assurance in health education and health promotion. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors.

KINE 495 (3) Internship in Kinesiology

Practical application of principles related to Kinesiology, as the student will intern at a site approved by the Program Director/Chair. Provides the student intern with a forum to discuss policies, career options, and practices within Kinesiology and solve potential challenges associated with the transition from student to professional. Includes resumes, cover letters, certifications, and interview techniques will also be covered.  May be repeated once for credit.  Graded Credit/No Credit. (Prerequisites:  Senior standing in last year of Program and consent of instructor/Program Chair).

PHIL 345 (3) Bioethics and Medical Ethics

A survey of ethical issues in biological and medical research and practice. Offers an introductory survey of ethical and moral theory, and investigates the application of moral and ethical theory to issues such as animal and human research, the doctor-patient relationship, reproductive technologies, and biotechnology.

PSYC 210 (3) Introduction to Developmental Psychology
An introductory survey course that utilizes a chronological approach to examine human development from birth through adolescence. Includes a study of physical development and health; developmental issues of children with special needs; cognitive and moral development; social and personality development; and genetic, sociocultural, and other influences on development. 
Undergrad Major Elective (3)

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