Faculty Center Research Colloquium

The Faculty Research Colloquium Dinner advances the mission of the Faculty Center by providing CSUSM faculty an opportunity to present their scholarly research to their university colleagues. The colloquium series is widely praised because it fosters collegiality and intellectual engagement across the disciplines. The Faculty Center Advisory Council selects one faculty presenter for each academic semester. Faculty members purchase tickets for the catered event.  The colloquia are limited to CSUSM tenure-track faculty, adjunct faculty, and ad­ministrators with faculty rank. Faculty are encouraged to respond to the forthcoming call and nominate colleagues for future colloquia.

Colloquium Speaker History


Fall 2014

Speaker:

Betsy Read, Ed.D. Professor, Molecular Cell Biology

RSVP by November 5, 2014

Please note: If you RSVP for this event and can no longer attend, please inform us before November 5th, or you will still be responsible for the $25 ticket.

Title: “The Pan Genome of Emiliania Huxleyi and the Hunt for Biomineralization Genes and Proteins”
Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 5:00p.m.-8:00p.m.
Location: McMahan House

Betsy Read is a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and is the Director of the Professional Masters Degree Program in Biotechnology.  She teaches courses in Molecular Cell Biology, Genomics and RNA Technologies, Bioinformatics, and Cellular Biotechnology.  For her research and teaching as two sides of the same coin. She relishes the opportunity, whether in the classroom or in the laboratory, to engage students in the innate creativity of science, the thrill of discovery, and the joy of seeking answers to explain the wonders of the natural world.

According to Betsy coccolithophorids are “flowers of the ocean”. Captured by their intrinsic beauty and spectacular morphological diversity, she seeks to unravel the molecular underpinnings governing the nanoscale shape and patterning of the calcium carbon cell coverings that distinguish these extraordinary phytoplankton.  Recently, Betsy and a consortium of 75 scientists from 12 nations sequenced and published the genome of the ubiquitous, and most prominent coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi. Decoding the genome and its 30,000 genes provides a blueprint that will define research conducted with E. huxleyi for the coming decades; enabling scientists to achieve a complete understanding of the remarkable ecological success of this tiny microcalcifier, and the impact it may have the environment and society.  This talk describes the pan genome of E. huxleyi and the hunt for biomineralization genes and proteins in these important marine algae.


Spring 2014

Speaker:

Michael McDuffie, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Philosophy

Title: “How I Fell in Love (with Bioethics)”
Date: Thursday, April 10, 2014 from 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Location: McMahan House

Michael McDuffie

In recent years, I have taken up bioethics and medical ethics as my primary research and teaching specialty.  Bioethics examines the ethics of bioscientific research and the application of scientific knowledge in fields like medicine, nursing, and biotechnology.  Bioethics includes clinical ethics, as a subfield of practical and professional ethics.  I did not start my career with this specialty.  My interest emerged from the personal journey that my family undertook when our first child was born with a serious congenital heart defect, requiring three open-heart surgeries in the first two years of his life.  That journey is long over now, for the most part, and we made it safely home:  Our son is almost twelve, and he enjoys a normal life, him and his scooter and his crazy reconstructed heart.  Still, the experience upended my career, took me out of the classroom for several years, and transformed my interior landscape as a thinker, philosophy student, and teacher.  I fell in deep for bioethics: the only thing to think about, at the end of that journey.  When I returned to teaching, I focused on nurse education, teaching medical ethics, trying to convey to my students the immeasurable human impact of effective medical and nursing care.  As I took on a multidisciplinary teaching literature, in philosophy, medicine, and law, my research interests turned more and more to matters of medical and nursing practice. I found my way back to the relevant aspects of my early philosophical education, as a student of the mind-body problem.  Working on very basic problems of consciousness and the phenomenology of perception, I had taken classes in the philosophy of psychiatry and philosophy of medicine. These old lessons gained new relevance, grounding my orientation as a teacher, scholar, and community member of a local hospital ethics committee, IRB, and palliative care committee.  Nowadays, my research is focused on different aspects of medical decision-making, particularly at the end of life---a primary focus of clinical ethics.  Themes include: concepts of patient competence and decisional capacity; issues in the ethics of organ donation; the operative role of concepts of moral authority and moral permission; philosophical debates over the clinical and legal definition of death; and basic considerations of the goals and duties of medical care, both curative and palliative.  I'm really excited by the work that I'm doing now, and I look forward to sharing some stories at the Dinner.  (The main story is a love story, and it has a happy ending.)


Fall 2013

Speaker:

Liliana Castañeda Rossmann, Ph.D. Professor, Communication

Title: “Transcending Gangs: Latinas Story Their Experience”
Date: Wednesday, November 6, 2013 from 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Location: McMahan House

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Liliana Castañeda Rossmann’s research theorizes on how humans co-create and maintain their identities by telling stories.  In particular, the stories of gang-involved Latinas have significant implications for transcending their gang experiences.  Gangs offer women opportunities for leadership which would be unattainable otherwise.   Yet, these leadership skills are hard-earned and, paradoxically, may marginalize them further once they leave the gang lifestyle.  What works to help them get out?  What works to keep them from getting involved in the first place?  Drawing from an eclectic array of approaches, Rossmann makes suggestions to provide young Latinas with viable options to transcend the gang. 


Save the Date!

Speaker:

Betsy Read
Professor, Molecular Cell Biology

Title: The Pan Genome of Emiliania Huxleyi and the Hunt for Biomineralization Genes and Proteins
Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.
Location: McMahan House

RSVP by November 5, 2014

Please make checks out to FOUNDATION.

Please note: If you RSVP for this event and can no longer attend, please inform us before November 5th, or you will still be responsible for the $25 ticket.