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Todd Astorino

Classes Taught At CSUSM

  • Kine 202 - Introduction to Kinesiology
  • Kine 326 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology
  • Kine 336 - Exercise Nutrition
  • Kine 406 - Stress Testing and Exercise Prescription

Education

  • 2001 Ph.D Exercise Physiology, University of New Mexico
  • 1998 M.S. Exercise Science, Arizona State University
  • 1993 B.A. Biological Sciences, CSU Sacramento

Professional Positions

  • 2014 - present: Full Professor, Kinesiology, CSU San Marcos, San Marcos, CA
  • 2008 - 14: Associate Professor, Kinesiology, CSU San Marcos, San Marcos CA
  • 2004 - 08: Assistant Professor, Kinesiology, CSU San Marcos, San Marcos CA
  • 2001 - 04: Assistant Professor, Exercise Science, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD

Dr. Todd Astorino
Professor

University Hall 322
astorino@csusm.edu
(760)750-7351

Dr. Astorino CV


Research

My research trajectory has vastly changed since my arrival to CSU—San Marcos in 2004 as well as throughout my tenure at our University.  I have dramatically developed as a scientist and with this growth, my expertise in various areas and willingness to initiate research in novel areas have expanded. Currently, my research:

  1. Examines the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on various markers of health status in populations ranging from sedentary individuals to men and women who are habitually active.  This area is fueled by my relative dislike for aerobic exercise and understanding that public health guidelines recommending 30 min/d of accumulated exercise are not ideal, and may not elicit optimal adaptation, in many individuals.  For example, we have shown that as little as 16 min of intense exercise performed over a 2 week period improves cardiorespiratory fitness and fat utilization in healthy men and women.

  2. Examines utility of novel exercise modalities in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) whose condition typically diminishes their access to exercise which leads to a decline in physical activity and hence increased risk of chronic disease.  My initial experience in this population was in the form of relatively simple acute studies examining cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise.  Currently, I am applying for grant funding to support chronic training studies in this population.