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Faculty Ethics

Definition:This policy defines ethical conduct for faculty members at California State University San Marcos and provides procedures for resolving the potential breach of ethical standards.
Authority:The policy is modeled on the Statement of Professional Ethics of the American Association of University Professors. (Procedures for resolving a potential breach of ethical standards have been designed to comply with the protection of faculty rights as st
Scope:All tenure-track and adjunct faculty at CSU San Marcos.
Responsible Division:Academic Affairs
Approval Date:04/17/2000
Originally Implemented:04/17/2000
Signature Page/PDF:View Signatures for Faculty Ethics Policy


Notes

INTRODUCTION

The following statement, based on the Statement of Professional Ethics of the American Association of University Professors, shall be the policy of the Faculty of California State University San Marcos concerning ethical conduct. Faculty includes adjunct and tenure-track professors.

I. AS MEMBERS OF THE TEACHING PROFESSION, FACULTY MEMBERS:

II. AS TEACHERS, FACULTY MEMBERS:  III. AS COLLEAGUES, FACULTY MEMBERS:  IV. AS MEMBERS OF AN ACADEMIC INSTITUTION, FACULTY MEMBERS: V. AS MEMBERS OF COMMUNITIES, FACULTY MEMBERS:

Procedure

Faculty members hold themselves, and each other, to a very high ethical standard. On rare occasions, however, faculty members may be confronted with apparent ethical violations by one or more of their colleagues. Wherever possible, disputes between faculty members should be resolved between the parties. Assistance to mediate the dispute is encouraged. Where these efforts have not resolved the matter, a written request for a hearing may be submitted. The response of faculty to apparent violations of the statement of ethics above shall be governed by the following rules:

I. ADVICE AND CONSULTATION II. MEDIATION EFFORTS  III. PROCEDURE FOR INITIATING ETHICS HEARING IV. THE HEARING V. OUTCOME OF HEARING
VI. DISSEMINATION OF POLICY

APPENDIX A: Conflicts of Interest

I. In the context of this Policy on Ethical Conduct, a conflict of interest is an agreement, relationship, or other arrangement, be it personal or professional, formal or informal, which undermines an individual faculty member´s impartial performance of their professional duties and obligations. Students have a just expectation that they will be instructed, evaluated, and supervised by an impartial and unbiased faculty member. Faculty members have a similar expectation that their professional and academic evaluations and supervision are free from the self-interest of their peers. Maintaining fairness and impartiality is one of the central ethical responsibilities of faculty. This fairness and impartiality assures both the academic integrity of the University and faculty academic freedom.

II. In addition to the legal contracts existing between students and the University, there is an equally important "social contract" between students and the faculty, in which each fulfills its duties and obligations to the other. Interests that conflict with those obligations include actions or requirements of the faculty that are grounded in private interest or gain, rather than in professional responsibility. Examples of conflicting interests grounded in private interest or gain are: requiring the purchase of course materials from which an instructor makes a profit; and giving academic credit for student research which the instructor puts to use for private gain or profit. This is not to discourage faculty from using their own faculty-authored books in their courses. Faculty members are encouraged to explore ways that profits may be otherwise distributed (e.g., CSUSM foundation, academic programs and departments).

III. Other conflicts of interest may arise in view of the disproportion of influence, authority and power between faculty and students. Thus, instructors should not engage students in their classes or under their supervision in relationships that are so personal that the presumption of professional fairness is difficult to maintain. Faculty members, for example, ought not instruct or supervise students who are obligated to them financially; and faculty ought not supervise or instruct students with whom they have relationships grounded in interests inconsistent with their professional responsibility and the mission of the University. These conflicts of interest include but are not restricted to sexual relationships, close personal friendships, close family relationships, and employer-employee or other fiduciary relationships.