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Precious Knowledge

Tuesday, April 4, 2017
5:30 – 8:00 pm, USU Ballroom

GCI Precious Knowledge Film Screening

Faculty Resources

Precious Knowledge tells the story of students and faculty who fight against calls to eliminate the Mexican American Studies Program at Tucson High School.  Tucson High’s Mexican American Studies Program was a national model of educational success, with 100 percent of enrolled students graduating from high school and 85 percent going on to attend college. The filmmakers spent an entire year in the classroom filming the social-justice curriculum and documenting the transformative impact on students. The program was eliminated in 2012, but the issues and themes addressed in this film have renewed importance and resonance today. A panel discussion will follow the film. You can watch the film’s trailer here:  http://www.preciousknowledgefilm.com/.

Co-sponsors: CHABSS Diversity Working Group and the Ethnic Studies Program

Community Service and Volunteer Fair 2017

CSVF Save the Date

Thursday, March 2, 2017
11:30 am – 1:30 pm, USU Ballroom

The CHABSS Global Commitment Initiative engages students in activities to broaden their understanding of global issues. The GCI Community Service Fair is an opportunity to put that global knowledge into action locally. Learn about volunteer opportunities that allow you to serve your local community while earning valuable experience and preparing for future careers.

The following organizations will be presents at this year's fair:

Download the CSVF flier >

Download the CSVF programs booklet >

View photos from the CSVF event >


Global Commitment Initiative: Global Film Series – Fall 2016

Llévate mis amores (All of Me): September 28, 2016, 5:30-8:00pm, USU Ballroom

A documentary that tells the stories of the women who live in La Patrona, a Mexican village that is situated by the tracks of a train from Central America that brings many migrants north to the United States.  “The Beast” – as the train is called - passes through the village.  Since 1995, the women in La Patrona have been feeding the stowaways onboard by throwing bags of cooked food and bottles of water onto the moving train as it passes through their village.  Both the women and the migrants face physical injury or death, as well as the legal consequences of their actions.

Evaporating Borders: November 2, 2016, 5:30-8:00pm, USU Ballroom

An essay in five parts, Evaporating Borders offers a series of vignettes, poetically guided by the filmmaker's curious eye and personal reflections. Through the people she encounters along the way, the film dissects the experience of asylum seekers in Cyprus: A PLO activist and exile from Iraq is denied asylum within 15 minutes; neo-nazi fundamentalists roam the streets in an attack on Muslim migrants; activists and academics organize an antifascist rally and clash with the neo-nazis; 195 migrants drown in the Mediterranean.  Originally from Yugoslavia and an immigrant to Cyprus, Iva Radivojevic investigates the effects of large-scale immigration on the sense of national identity in one of the easiest ports of entry into Fortress Europe. Poetically photographed and rendered, the film passionately weaves the themes of migration, tolerance, identity and belonging. Trailer: evaporating borders


Spring 2016 Global Film Series

Film Screening of Purgatorio

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
5:30 – 8:30 pm, USU Ballroom

Presented by The College of Humanities, Arts, Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Global Commitment Initiative with support from Co-Curricular Funding Awards, Film Studies, Latin@ Center, and Border Angels de CSUSM

Film description: At times harrowing, at times hauntingly beautiful, "Purgatorio" exposes the politics of and around the US-Mexico border not so much by explicitly addressing the technical intricacies of migration regimes, but by capturing experiences in the border region on a human scale. In its display of the widespread exposure to different forms of violence on both sides of the border, the film also succeeds in depicting the peculiar interplay between the presence and the absence of government authorities that structures 'la frontera'.  This film should be of interest to everyone in the social sciences and the humanities who teaches in migration and border studies.

December 2015 - A group of students in Global Studies 300 at California State University San Marcos created this video to raise awareness about human trafficking.  Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery in which traffickers use force, fraud, or coercion to control victims.  Human trafficking can take many forms, including sex trafficking, migrant work, domestic work, debt bondage, and child soldiers.  Every year, human traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits.  Traffickers are estimated to exploit 20.9 million victims, with an estimated 1.5 million victims in North America. Although awareness is growing, human trafficking continues to go underreported due to its covert nature, misconceptions about its definition, and a lack of awareness about its indicators.  Social media is one avenue through which victims are sought and entrapped.  As such, we ask that you post this video to your social media accounts and encourage others to watch it and be aware of the signs of human trafficking

Fall 2015 Global Film Series

In Fall 2015, the Global Commitment Initiative teamed with the Department of Global Studies and the Division of community Engagement to provide educational opportunities on the issue of human trafficking. Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery in which traffickers use force, fraud, or coercion to control victims. Human trafficking can take many forms, including sex trafficking, migrant work, domestic work, debt bondage, and child soldiers. Every year, human traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits. Traffickers are estimated to exploit 20.9 million victims, with an estimated 1.5 million victims in North America. Although awareness is growing, human trafficking continues to go underreported due to its covert nature, misconceptions about its definition, and a lack of awareness about its indicators.

Global Commitment Initiative Global Film Series

The Global Commitment Initiative sponsored the screening of two films on the topic of human trafficking. The first screening was of “Not My Life”, which is the first film to depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale. Filmed on five continents, in a dozen countries, “Not My Life” takes viewers into a world where millions of children are exploited, every day, through an astonishing array of practices including forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual violence, and child soldiering. The film was followed by a discussion about prevention and prosecution with Chief Deputy District Attorney Summer Stephan and Danny F. Santiago Task Force Commander, California Department of Justice, Bureau of Investigation, San Diego Human Trafficking Task Force. There were over 400 students, staff, and faculty in attendance.
The second screening was of “Not For Sale”, which focuses on people who are trying to end human trafficking. “Based on the book Not For Sale by David Batstone, [the film] covers what modern-day abolitionists are doing to fight the rampant terrors of human trafficking in the US and abroad. Traveling over 120,000 miles across five continents, Producer and Director Robert Marcarelli and his film crew gathered undercover footage on this billion-dollar industry and interviewed the heroes that are determined to see it end. Not only does the film expose harsh realities, but it also breathes new hope into the issue by documenting the valiant work of contemporary emancipators and the practical steps they’ve taken to mount an anti-slavery movement. Stories told by the people who’ve lived them, these compelling accounts aim to inspire individuals to practical action.” The film was followed by a panel discussion with Mayra Aguilar (North County Lifeline), Anthony DeGuzman (Bilateral Safety Corridor Coalition), Crystal Isle (survivor of human trafficking; Freedom From Exploitation), and Tom Jones (survivor of human trafficking; "The Healing, Outreach and Peer Empowerment (H.O.P.E.) Project”). There were 400 students, staff, and faculty in attendance. The panel discussed ways to combat human trafficking and students were exposed to the myriad of ways they can help address this global issue that is happening in their own back years. Students were exposed to volunteer opportunities with these organizations.

Global Studies Department and Division of Community Engagement Town Hall

The GCI film series on human trafficking is linked with the Town Hall project spearheaded by the Division of Community Engagement and the Global Studies Department. The Town Hall project is a forum for discussion of political issues and public policies. Student-centered dialogue sessions and roundtable workshops are designed to provide students the opportunity to engage in civic discourse and begin to develop the tools needed for lifelong democratic participation. The students in all four sections of Global Studies 300 participated in the Town Hall on December 1, 2015. Community experts on human trafficking for the greater San Diego area guided the students in their dialogue sessions and students created a plan for civic engagement in the roundtable sessions. Students in GBST 300 spent the semester researching issues related to human trafficking and formed groups around these issues (sex trafficking, domestic workers, migrant workers, debt bondage, child soldiers, prevention, protection, and prosecution). These issues were the topics of the Town Hall.
The student group focusing on Prevention in one section of GBST 300 created a short film to raise awareness of the issue of human trafficking: https://youtu.be/DY6NRwd5Owo. Part of the goals of the Town Hall project is for students to see the connections between the global and the local. Although human trafficking is a widespread global issue, it is also happening in our own backyards. So GBST 300 students Jacob Bowen, Taylor King, Travis Linder, Marlene Schjoelberg, and Arvin Taduran made a dramatic video that includes information in twelve languages to raise awareness about human trafficking. Faculty are asked to share this link with their students and request they post it to their social media sites. Social media is a forum through which human traffickers access and entice their victims. Thus the students want social media to be used as a forum to educate and inform about the dangers of human trafficking.

Film Screening of Not for Sale

This film focuses on people who are trying to end human trafficking.  Based on the book Not For Sale by David Batstone, [the film] covers what modern-day abolitionists are doing to fight the rampant terrors of human trafficking in the US and abroad. Traveling over 120,000 miles across five continents, Producer and Director Robert Marcarelli and his film crew gathered undercover footage on this billion-dollar industry and interviewed the heroes that are determined to see it end. Not only does the film expose harsh realities, but it also breathes new hope into the issue by documenting the valiant work of contemporary emancipators and the practical steps they’ve taken to mount an anti-slavery movement. Stories told by the people who’ve lived them, these compelling accounts aim to inspire individuals to practical action.

Film Screening of Not My Life

Not My Life is the first film to depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale. Filmed on five continents, in a dozen countries, Not My Life takes viewers into a world where millions of children are exploited, every day, through an astonishing array of practices including forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual violence, and child soldiering. "Human traffickers are earning billions of dollars on the backs and in the beds of our children," says the film's director, Academy Award nominee, Robert Bilheimer, "and yet no one knows this is happening." We have a huge responsibility, right now, to learn the truth and act on it.

Challenging though it may be, Not My Life's message is ultimately one of hope. Victims of slavery can be set free and go on to live happy and productive lives. Those who advocate for slavery victims are growing in numbers, and are increasingly effective. At this crossroads for the defining human rights issue of our time, Not My Life tells us, as the late Jonathan Mann said, "We can no longer flee, no longer hide, no longer separate ourselves.


Spring 2015 Community Service Fair

The CHABSS Global Commitment Initiative engages students in activities to broaden their understanding of global issues. The GCI Community Service Fair is an opportunity to put that global knowledge into action locally. Learn about volunteer opportunities that allow you to serve your local community while earning valuable experience and preparing for future careers.


Global Migration Series

The GCI and Engaging Diverse Dialogues Initiative offered a series of events around a shared theme of "Global Migration" during the Fall 2014 semester to engage students, faculty, staff, and the community on the issue of global immigration patterns and how these patterns effect our students, campus, and local communities. More than 1,000 people participated in these events.

A packed house of more than 400 students, faculty, and community members turned out for the GCI kickoff event in September, a screening and discussion of the film Documented by Jose Antonio Vargas. Panelists for the post-film discussion included Dr. Gail Perez (USD Ethnic Studies faculty), Dr. Vincent Pham (CSUSM Communication faculty), Joseph Allen Ruanto-Ramirez (UCSD Cross-Cultural Center), and Thiana Ruiz (CSUSM student).
A diverse crowd attended the follow-up event in October, a screening of Underwater Dreams and talk by activist Dulce Matuz, which was organized by the Cross-Cultural Center and co-sponsored with the College of Science and Mathematics, among others.
The final installment, a screening of the Academy Award-winning film Innocente organized by Fredi Avalos and the Engaging Diverse Dialogues Initiative, drew 500 attendees in November. The panel discussion that followed included Visual Arts Professor David Avalos and Sociology Professor Marisol Clark-Ibáñez, Allison Bechill from Casa Cornelia Law Center, and CSUSM student Karen Guzxan.
This series represented an important opportunity for CHABSS and CSUSM to take a much-needed leadership role at a time of growing tension and unrest in our campus, neighborhoods, nation, and world.