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  • ACCT 482-4, ST: Financial Statement Analysis

    Expands understanding of the business environment and financial reporting. Includes profitability analysis, credit risk analysis, forecasting financial statements, and how to make business valuation decisions.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 302, ACCT 306, and FIN 304 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) in each.

  • AMD 380-7, ST: Visionary Artists of Color

    Explores the work and lived experiences of BIPOC (Black/African American, Indigenous, and People of Color) artists in the contemporary art world and focuses on themes, representation, and issues that specifically affect BIPOC artists. Includes artists from intersectional marginalized identities. Lectures and readings will be complemented by visiting artists, museum/gallery visits (real or virtual), and film/video.

  • Biol 486-2. ST: MARINE COMMUNITIES

    Builds upon a strong ecological foundation, while focusing on the organisms and processes that shape diverse marine ecosystems, particularly benthic communities. Covers fundamental features of nearshore, coastal, and deep ocean marine communities and ways in which they are being modified.

    Prerequisite: BIOL 354 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

  • BIOL 486-9, ST: CELL AND TISS BIOMECH

    Studies force, motion, and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings and even stars and galaxies. Covers principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. Focuses on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations, and recognizing medical applications.

    Prerequisite:  MATH 160; Co-requisite: BIOL 487-3

  • BIOL 486-17, ST: Tutorial methods of instruction

    Teaches active learning methods to student Learning Assistants, including facilitating discussion, grading of assignments or class presentations, or monitoring and assisting virtual participants in live and online classes.

  • BIOL 596-10, ST: MICROBIAL GENOMICS

    Addresses the evolution, biodiversity, and sequencing of bacterial and viral genomes. Applies these concepts to study bioenergetics, utilization of gene knockout libraries, genomics of antibiotic resistance, and microbial forensics. Utilizes course material completely drawn from primary literature in the field of microbial genomics, addressing foundational and current topics in the field.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 351 or BIOL 355 with a grade of C (2.0), or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

  • BIOL 596-13, ST: Topics in Insect Physiology and Biochemistry

    Teaches about insects as model organisms and the most numerous and most successful clade of invertebrates. Covers major physiological systems of insects – development, respiration, digestion and excretion, nervous and endocrine systems, locomotion, and thermal tolerance. Emphasizes relations between these organ systems and processes and environmental and endocrine physiology of insects. Culminates in a novel insect-based research proposal relevant to the native or invasive insects of California.

  • DNCE 130-11, ST: LATINX IMPROV DANCE

    Introduces the basic movement vocabularies, embodied connections, and spatial explorations of various Latin American dance genres, including cumbia, bloco afro, samba, bachata, and merengue. Familiarizes students with LatinX polyrhythms, dance styles, and perspectives to develop unique improvisational and movement skills while learning about the sociohistorical context of each dance form.  Subject matter and learning is enhanced via viewings, readings, discussions, and creative projects.

  • DNCE 392-1, ST: BLACK DANCE

    Provides an opportunity to learn about recent developments in the Black dance tradition. Approaches blackness as a political identity, social marker, aesthetic quality, and/or historical force. Includes choreographic subjects in dance practices, theater, performance art, ritual, and community activism. Combines historical survey, critical analysis, and artistic exploration. Students interact with the subject matter via guest artist classes, viewings, readings, lectures, discussions, and creative projects.
  • EDUC 593-2, ST: CP SEMINAR

    Guides the teacher candidate to develop, discuss, and reflect on an actionable and sustainable vision of teaching and learning that is responsive to the changing context of a given school and local education agency. Includes the ability to understand and implement the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs), reflection on clinical practice, and coursework experiences. 

    Enrollment restricted to students in the Multiple Subject teacher preparation program. 

    Corequisite: EDMS 571, or EDMS 572, or EDMS 573.

  • ENTR 482-4, ST: LAUNCHING YOUR STARTUP

    Explores the management and funding challenges inherent in launching a new venture.  Builds necessary skills to take an idea developed in previous courses through the process of early-stage commercialization. Provides hands-on experiences in organizing a new venture (e.g. legal structures, boards of directors) and accessing early-stage startup funding. Launch and grow a new business venture, and develop early-stage fundraising, using skills and knowledge gained in this course.

    Prerequisite: ENTR 320.

  • GBST 390-11, ST: DEMOCR ELECT VIOL AFRICA

    An overview of the democratization process in Africa. Discussion of Authoritarian, Hybrid regimes, and Democratic political systems. Study of forms of political change through revolutions, coups, and democratization with the application of democratization theories and their resultant challenges in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PSCI 390-27 and GBST 390-11 are cross-listed. Students may not receive credit for both. 

  • HD 370-8, ST: HD IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

    Introduces contemporary issues of injustice and how oppression impact individuals' healthy human development from a global perspective. Focuses on three social categories of individuals: age, gender, and socioeconomic status and intersectionality of these categories globally, and examines how individuals experience social advantages and disadvantages cumulatively increase by generation. 

    Prerequisites: ANTH 200, HD 101, and HD 102.

  • MLAN 390-1, ST: FOOD, CULTURE, IDENTITIES

    Exploration of food cultures and their representations in visual and print media in the French and Francophone world. Includes analysis of various text types (including film, food writing, poetry, essays, etc.) Introduces text and film analysis and fundamentals of cultural studies.

    Satisfies GE area: CC  
    Satisfies Diversity & Equity area: DEg 

  • PHYS 180-1, ST: Introduction to Being a Physicist

    Provides insight to the career of a physicist at CSUSM and after graduation. Covers professional development, educational planning, and physics as a profession. Reviews the physics major roadmap, with emphasis on the importance of the required courses. Incorporates lectures given by student and faculty researchers doing physics and physics-related research at CSUSM, local industry, and nearby universities. 1 hour of lecture per week.

  • PSCI 390-27, ST: DEMOCR ELECT VIOL AFRICA

    An overview of the democratization process in Africa. Discussion of Authoritarian, Hybrid regimes, and Democratic political systems. Study of forms of political change through revolutions, coups, and democratization with the application of democratization theories and their resultant challenges in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PSCI 390-27 and GBST 390-11 are cross-listed. Students may not receive credit for both.
  • PSCI 479-2, ST: POL THEORY AND ENVIRONMENT

    Addresses racial, economic, or ethnic inequalities in environmental conditions, and defines the goals of local and transnational activism aimed at addressing these inequities. Examines how notions of justice and human rights have been brought to bear on environmental and sustainability debates. Begins with examining the theoretical and historical basis of the environmental justice and human rights movements, and proceeds to examine a series of issues and cases.

  • PSYC 440-7, ST: MENTAL HEALTH IN THE MEDIA

    Explores historic and contemporary portrayals of mental health and psychopathology in film, television, and other forms of media.  The course also examines common lore, stigma, divergent conceptualizations, and interpretations of mental disorders in popular culture.  Students engage in an in-depth study of mental health disorders.  Students also analyze and critique media representations of mental health issues and disorders. 

    Prerequisite: PSYC 100

     
  • SSCI 385-1, ST: POP CULTURE & SOC ISSUES

    Examines contemporary social problems through the lens of popular culture. Applies various forms of media to enhance interdisciplinary social science understandings and analysis of social issues. May be substituted for an elective in a Social Sciences major Secondary Field.

  • UNIV 180-3, ST: SELF AND LEARNING

    Supports second-year students.  Emphasizes the fostering of a diverse, inclusive academic community, and provides a student-centered learning experience for second-year students. Engages second-year students in meaningful self-assessment and identity development to strengthen short-term and long-term life goals.

    Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.