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AMD 380-3:  Museum and Curatorial Practice

Provides an introduction to museum studies and curatorial practice. Includes the selection, collection, display, and maintenance of a collection of any form of media in real or virtual spaces. Offers a general introduction to the complex role of the museum in contemporary society, and hands-on experience planning, designing, installing, and publicizing a museum exhibition.

AMD 380-4:  Digital Drawing

Develops digital drawing skills with 21st Century tools and techniques on the computer and mobile devices. Students will master a range of advanced drawing skills while completing digital drawing projects. Projects are designed to strengthen the skills to represent the illusion of the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional surface and to develop the ability to compose a drawing that unites form with content that is derived from personal and cultural subject matter.

Recommended preparation:

One of the following preferred:

  • VSAR130 Visual Arts Fundamentals
  • VSAR131 Drawing I
  • VSAR311 Drawing II
  • or equivalent 2-D design or Drawing class from other colleges

AMD 380-5: Digital Production and Borders

Explores border topics through digital methodologies, moving from concept to the enactment of cultural expression through art. Incorporates studio-based digital processes, with a focus on photography. Emphasizes creative practices as tools for discussing border issues, resulting in the development and articulation of concepts for topic-based artworks. Draws on historical and contemporary examples of artistic interventions at the border; explores ways in which design concepts can be realized through individual and collaborative practice. Includes site-based work and individual and group projects.

BIOL 486-1: Plant Diversity Discussion

Group discussions of assigned primary literature readings pertaining to the plant group examined in BIOL 381L.

BIOL 486-9: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics

Studies force, motion and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings and even stars and galaxies.  Covers principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

  • Prerequisite:  MATH 160
  • Co-requisites:  BIOL 486-10  and  BIOL 487-3

BIOL 486-10: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Discussion

Studies force, motion, and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings, and even stars and galaxies.  Emphasis on quantitative problems in cell and tissue biomechanics. Studies principles of mechanics applies to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications.  Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

  • Prerequisite:  MATH 160
  • Co-requisites: 486-9 and BIOL 487-3

BIOL 486-15 - ST: Vertebrate Biology Discussion

Focus on providing additional hands-on experience with the tools and techniques of vertebrate biology in the lab and field, presentations, and/or topical discussions of the relevant scientific literature. One hour of field/laboratory.

  • Corequisites: BIOL 400 and BIOL 400L

BIOL 487-3: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Lab

Studies force, motion and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings and even stars and galaxies.  Uses experiments to observe and study the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue). Focuses on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

  • Prerequisite:  MATH 160
  • Co-requisites: BIOL 486-9 and BIOL 486-10

BIOL 596-3: Avian Biology

Studies birds, encompassing traditional ornithology and applied avian ecology, covering the fundamentals of avian systematics, evolution, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, and conservation. Major topics include dinosaur origins, flight mechanics and physiology, foraging and feeding behavior, social interactions, life-history strategies, and population dynamics.

  • Prerequisite: BIOL 353 or BIOL 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

BIOL 596-5: Research Methods in Molecular Evolution and Ecology

Application of modern molecular tools to identify and study ecological and evolutionary relationships.  Two hours lecture.  

  • Prerequisites: BIOL 352 or BIOL 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.
  • Co-requisite: BIOL 597-5

BIOL 596-6: Avian Biology Discussion

Focus on providing additional hands-on experience with the tools and techniques of ornithology and avian ecology in the lab and field, presentations, and/or topical discussions of the relevant scientific literature. One hour of field/laboratory.

  • Prerequisites: Biol 353 or Biol 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences Graduate Program.
  • Co-requisites: BIOL 596-3 and BIOL 597-4

BIOL 597-4: Avian Biology Lab and Field Studies

Focus on providing direct, hands-on experience with the tools and techniques of ornithology and avian ecology. Three hours of laboratory. Field trip(s) during or outside of class (including weekends), on or off-campus, may be required.

  • Prerequisites: Biol 353 or Biol 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences Graduate Program.
  • Co-requisites: BIOL 596-3 and BIOL 596-6

BIOL 597-5: Research Methods in Molecular Evolution & Ecology Lab

Application of modern molecular tools to identify and study ecological and evolutionary relationships.  Three hours laboratory activity.  Mandatory periodic field trips.

  • Prerequisites: BIOL 352 and BIOL 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.
  • Co-requisite: BIOL 596-5

BIOL 686-10: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Lecture

Covers the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. This knowledge will help us understand the function of living systems, predict changes due to mechanical alterations and recognize medical applications.

  • Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.
  • Co-requisites: BIOL 686-11 and BIOL 687-1

BIOL 686-11: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Discussion

Covers solving quantitative problems in cell and tissue biomechanics. Emphasis on the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

  • Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.
  • Co-requisites: BIOL 686-10 and BIOL 687-1

CS 597-2: Mobile and IoT Security

Introduces students to the state-of-the-art research in mobile and IoT (Internet of Things) security. Includes mobile and IoT wireless security; security and privacy in emerging networks; mobile application and system security; and location and activity privacy. 

  • Enrollment requirement: Graduate standing
  • Prerequisite for undergraduates and enrollment requirement for graduate students: CS 433

ECON 481-13 - ST: Economics of Climate Change

Examines the economic effects of climate change. Some important topics explored include communities and countries most affected by climate change, impact of climate change on agricultural production, our food supply, livelihoods, air quality, human health, and ecosystems, different methods of measuring the economic cost of climate change, how international climate negotiations mitigate and prevent the effects of climate change. Considers policy options that will help different communities and groups to adapt to climate change and explores economic models and impacts of policies intended to affect the rate or nature of climate change.

  • Prerequisite: ECON 201

FIN 482-1:  Personal Finance 

*Second offering Spring 2020

Selected aspects of finance encountered by an individual during his or her lifetime. Focus on basic principles of personal financial planning, including basic time value of money problems, compiling personal financial statements, distinguishing between various types of checking and savings accounts, examining various types of consumer credit, and making distinctions between stocks, bonds, mutual funds and real estate.

FIN 484-3: Finance and Law

Examines the financial regulatory framework, the structuring of transactions within such framework, major legal issues, offshore structures, and micro-level examinations of different types of financial transactions and contracts. Topics include corporate structuring and shareholder arrangements, deal due diligence, financing documentation, practical management strategies, and international financing and tax structuring. Includes drafting practice of common deal documentation.

GBST - 390-10 - ST: Water, Climate, and Politics in the Middle East // Cross-listed w/ PSCI 390-25

Explores the political struggles of governments and societies to adapt to increasing water stress from climate change, urbanization, and demographic change in the Middle East and North Africa.  Examines the experiences of oil-wealthy countries (Saudi Arabia) and how they have adapted to growing water scarcity, as well as the experiences of poorer countries (Yemen) and the extraordinary challenges posed by the intersection of poverty, environmental degradation, and regional conflicts.

GBST 390-10 and PSCI 390-25 are cross-listed. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST - 300-17 - ST: The Rise and Fall of Apartheid South Africa

Examines the history of why and how the White-led government of South Africa established the policy of Apartheid/apartness or racial separation after the National Party electoral victory in 1948, and the struggle by the oppressed black population to defeat this policy. Focuses on the key legislation passed since the creation of the South African State in 1910 that became the foundation of Apartheid, and the impact of this systematic policy of racial discrimination on black people, as well as the organizations that emerged against it.

MDIA - 470-3 - ST: Queer Media

Examines media representations of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer (LGBTQ) people. Explores representation, production and reception of media in its socio-historical contexts, with special attention made to intersectional issues of identity and global media. Analyzes media through rhetorical, media studies and queer studies perspectives, with the purpose of demonstrating how communities are created, identities are communicated, and persuasive elements are employed in producing and contesting the historical and cultural memory of LGBTQ communities.

  • Prerequisites: COMM 360 or WGSS 205

OM 484-4: Advanced Business Analytics (2nd offering) 

Introduces advanced business analytics concepts and tools that are used in various business applications. Consists of three distinct parts: descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics.  Subjects include visual analytics, dashboard design, data mining for business application, prescriptive modeling, multi-criteria decision making.  Enrollment restricted to students who have completed the lower-division pre-business core requirement (major status in Business Administration, i.e., attained business status).

  • Prerequisite: BUS 324 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

PSCI 390-22: The Game of Politics

Analysis of political phenomena using rational choice and game theories. Introduction to basic concepts and notions of rational choice and game theories and the application of the theories in domestic and international politics. Focuses on strategic interactions among citizens, politicians, interest groups, organizations, and states.

PSCI 390-25

{Crosslist with GBST 390-10}

SPAN - 390-01 - ST: Specialized Spanish Translation

Focus on advanced skills in translation in different settings, including medical, legal, economic, communication, and education. Includes use of translation as an important resource for language learning. 

  • Prerequisite: SPAN 303. 

UNIV 302-3:  Thriving After Transfer: Success Strategies

Designed for students who encountered academic challenges upon transferring to CSUSM. Offers collaborative and supportive learning environments to enhance students’ academic foundation. Topics include mindset, strengths, time management and study skills, personal wellness, and academic planning that will lead to timely graduation. A hybrid learning model designed to ensure connections to campus community while also supporting student autonomy.

VPA 380-30: Disney and Performance

Designed to expand students familiarity with Disney media and branded products as a means of exploring constructions of gender, class, race, sexuality, and nationality through the lens of films, television, and stage plays created by the Disney Company. Challenges students to approach Disney in a framework of performance. Looks at films, television, and plays within the historical and cultural contexts of their production, and considers how these media work to define and produce culture.