Your  Account:

Live and Online (L&O) Examples

While there are numerous combinations of methods, below are two sample structures:

Faculty may split the class into two or three groups (depending on the class structure) and engage one group of students face-to face on one day while the rest of the class engages synchronously and virtually with that session. Then the faculty would engage a different group of students face-to-face on the next class meeting, while the rest of the students attend that session synchronously and virtually.

Scheduling this session might look like:

Example Face-to-Face & Synchronous Schedule

Class/Group

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Class A, Group 1

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Class A, Group 2

Live and Online Synchronous

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Live and Online Synchronous

Class A, Group 3

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Additionally, it is possible that one group of students in the class never meets face-to-face and only engages these sessions in a synchronous and virtual manner. This format may not be useful or even practical for the current context (remember this modality was not designed to address current contexts). The advantage is that it accommodates a portion of the students that may be unable to come to campus during the semester. The downsides are that this student would likely be better served in a synchronous virtual course and it brings up potential issues about which students are allowed/required to do which mode and whether both experiences are equal. 

Scheduling this session might look like:

Example Synchronous & Virtual Schedule 

 Class/Group

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Class A, Group 1

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Class A, Group 2

Live and Online Synchronous

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Live and Online Synchronous

Class A, Group 3

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Meet in Univ. Hall 123

Class A, Group 4

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Live and Online Synchronous

Note: Class A, Group 4 is at the faculty's discretion and can only be offered after the course begins.

Given that this is the modality that faculty are least familiar with, we have included additional resources from the  CSU Chico’s Teaching & Learning Program website.

Who should teach Live and Online?

  • Faculty comfortable with technology (summer training will be offered and classroom tech support is possible)
  • Faculty comfortable with juggling multiple audiences in multiple environments (face-to-face in the classroom and online)
  • Faculty organized and prepared in advance for lessons and activities
  • Faculty comfortable with multiple styles of teaching/pedagogy who are able to keep students engaged both in the classroom and those online

Who should not teach in Live and Online?

  • Faculty who aren’t comfortable with technology
  • Faculty not comfortable with two audiences at once and may not wish to meet the challenge  to keep students engaged both in the classroom and online
  • Faculty who are not experienced and well-versed in online methods of instruction
  • Faculty who typically  have not prepared course materials in advance.
  • Faculty who primarily lecture should consider using recorded video of lectures  or teach wholly online via Zoom

How Do I Design a Live and Online Course?

In order to ensure equity across the environments, faculty should be intentional in decisions made about delivery of content and student engagement.  Here are some points to consider:

  • Promote activities that involve both students present face-to-face and students attending synchronously.
    • For example, how to do “think, pair, and share” with both and potentially across audiences?
    • Using polling to engage both groups of students.
  • Methods for inclusion when speaking to different audiences at the same time that interact in different ways.
  • Use Zoom chat for classroom questions and communication for all students.
  • Limitation of students who are face-to-face but still need to be social distancing.
  • Take advantage of technology and various tools to promote engagement and participation. (Faculty Center training is available on these suggestions.)
    • Use the LMS to structure your course so that everyone has the same access to each other and to content.
    • POLL EVERYWHERE (pre-planned polling questions for engagement and reflection back to the whole class) - All students can be polled wherever they are.
    • Use Google (Docs, Jamboard, Currents, etc.) for students to collaborate on documents in real-time whether in the classroom (with computer) or online.