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ART=OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH-BASED TALKING POINTS WITH RESEARCH ANNOTATIONS

Special thanks to the ArtsEdSearch research database, a project of the Arts Education Partnership

ART=OPPORTUNITY is a campaign highlighting arts literacy as vital to student success. Here is why:

Preparing for the Workforce:

Arts literate students are creative students who can think outside the box, take risks, be flexible, and innovate.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Lichtenberg, J., Woock, C., & Wright, M. (2008). Ready to innovate: Are educators and executives aligned on the creative readiness of the U.S. workforce? New York, NY: The Conference Board.

(https://www.providenceri.com/efile/3396)

Luftig, R. (2000). An investigation of an arts infusion program on creative thinking, academic achievement, affective functioning, and arts appreciation of children at three grade levels. Studies in Art Education, 41(3), 208-227.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/an-investigation-of-an-arts-infusion-program-on-creative-thinking-academic-achievement-affective-functioning-and-arts-appreciation-of-children-at-three-grade-levels)

Moga, E., Burger, K., Hetland, L., & Winner, E. (2000). Does studying the arts engender creative thinking? Evidence for near but not far transfer. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 34(3/4), 91-104.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/does-studying-the-arts-engender-creative-thinking-evidence-for-near-but-not-far-transfer)

Dunbar, K. N. (2008). Arts education, the brain, and language. In C. Asbury & C. Rich (Eds.) Learning, Arts, and the Brain. New York, NY: Dana Foundation.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/arts-education-the-brain-and-language)

Karakelle, S. (2009). Enhancing fluent and flexible thinking through the creative drama process. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 4(2), 124-129.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/enhancing-fluent-and-flexible-thinking-through-the-creative-drama-process)

Imms, W., Jeanneret, N., & Stevens-Ballenger, J. (2011). Partnerships between schools and the professional arts sector: Evaluation of impact on student outcomes. Southbank, Victoria: Arts Victoria.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/partnerships-between-schools-and-the-professional-arts-sector-evaluation-of-impact-on-student-outcomes)

Arts literate students know how to cooperate and collaborate.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Heath, S., & Roach, A. (1999). Imaginative actuality: Learning in the arts during nonschool hours. Chapter in E. Fiske (Ed.), Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning. Washington DC: Arts Education Partnership and President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 19-34.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/imaginative-actuality-learning-in-the-arts-during-nonschool-hours)

Malin, H. (2012). Creating a children’s art world: Negotiating participation, identity, and meaning in the elementary school art room. International Journal of Education and the Arts, 13 (6).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/creating-a-children%E2%80%99s-art-world-negotiating-participation-identity-and-meaning-in-the-elementary-school-art-room)

Seidel, S. (1999). Stand and Unfold Yourself. Report on the Shakespeare & Co. Summer Shakespeare Program. Chapter in E. Fiske (Ed.), Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning. Washington DC: Arts Education Partnership and President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 79-90.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/stand-and-unfold-yourself-report-on-the-shakespeare-co-summer-shakespeare-program)

Arts literate students can problem solve.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Costa-Giomi, E. (1999). The effects of three years of piano instruction on children’s cognitive development. Journal of Research in Music Education. 47:3 198-212.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-effects-of-three-years-of-piano-instruction-on-children%E2%80%99s-cognitive-development)

Korn, R. (2010). Educational research: The art of problem solving. New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Visitor Studies, Evaluation & Audience Research.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/educational-research-the-art-of-problem-solving)

Arts literate students are sought-after as employees and set higher career goals.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Catterall, J. S., Dumais, S. A., & Hampden-Thompson, G. (2012). The arts and achievement in at-risk youth: Findings from four longitudinal studies. Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Arts.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-arts-and-achievement-in-at-risk-youth-findings-from-four-longitudinal-studies)

Cooper, Christine, Ritter-Martinez, Stephanie, & Entis, George (2016). The 2015 Otis Report on the Creative Economy. Los Angeles, CA: LA County Economic Development Corporation for the Otis Institute.

(http://www.otis.edu/sites/default/files/2015-CA-Region-Creative-Economy-Report-WEB-FINAL.pdf)

Arts literate students have proven leadership capacity.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Heath, S., & Roach, A. (1999). Imaginative actuality: Learning in the arts during nonschool hours. Chapter in E. Fiske (Ed.), Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning. Washington DC: Arts Education Partnership and President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 19-34.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/imaginative-actuality-learning-in-the-arts-during-nonschool-hours)

Heath, S. & Wolf, S. (2005). Focus in creative learning: Drawing on art for language development. Literacy 39(1): 38-45.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/focus-in-creative-learning-drawing-on-art-for-language-development)

Winner, E., Hetland, L., Veenema, S., Sheridan, K., Palmer, P., Locher, I., et al. (2006). Studio thinking: How visual arts teaching can promote disciplined habits of mind. New directions in aesthetics, creativity, and the arts, 189-205.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/studio-thinking-how-visual-arts-teaching-can-promote-disciplined-habits-of-mind)

Kennedy, R. (1998). The effects of musical performance, rational emotive therapy and vicarious experience on the self-efficacy and self-esteem of juvenile delinquents and disadvantage children. (Doctoral dissertation) University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-effects-of-musical-performance-rational-emotive-therapy-and-vicarious-experience-on-the-self-efficacy-and-self-esteem-of-juvenile-delinquents-and-disadvantage-children)

Weinstein, S. (2010). "A unified poet alliance": The personal and social outcomes of youth spoken word poetry programming. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 11(2).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/a-unified-poet-alliance-the-personal-and-social-outcomes-of-youth-spoken-word-poetry-programming)

Catterall, James S. (2009). Doing well and doing good by doing art: The effects of education in the visual and performing arts on the achievements and values of young adults. Los Angeles/London: Imagination Group/I-Group Books.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/doing-well-and-doing-good-by-doing-art-the-effects-of-education-in-the-visual-and-performing-arts-on-the-achievements-and-values-of-young-adults)

Active Engagement in Society/Life:

Arts literacy gives students voice to participate in learning and to tell their stories.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Nelson, B. (2011). “I made myself”: Playmaking as a pedagogy of change with urban youth. Research in Drama Education Journal, 16(20) 1-17.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/%E2%80%9Ci-made-myself%E2%80%9D-playmaking-as-a-pedagogy-of-change-with-urban-youth)

Weinstein, S. (2010). "A unified poet alliance": The personal and social outcomes of youth spoken word poetry programming. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 11(2).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/a-unified-poet-alliance-the-personal-and-social-outcomes-of-youth-spoken-word-poetry-programming)

Arts literacy opens doors to developing empathy, kindness, and cross-cultural understanding.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Kang Song, Y. I. & Gammel, J. A. (2011). Ecological mural as community reconnection. International Journal of Art & Design Education, 30, 266–278.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/ecological-mural-as-community-reconnection)

Stevenson, L. M. (2011). Creating destiny: Youth, arts and social change. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/creating-destiny-youth-arts-and-social-change)

Arts literacy provides students with hope and resiliency.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

DeMoss, K. & Morris, T. (2002). How arts integration supports student learning: Students shed light on the connections. Chicago, IL: Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/how-arts-integration-supports-student-learning-students-shed-light-on-the-connections)

Scott, L. (1992). Attention and perseverance behaviors of preschool children enrolled in Suzuki violin lessons and other activities. Journal of Research in Music Education, 40, 225-235.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/attention-and-perseverance-behaviors-of-preschool-children-enrolled-in-suzuki-violin-lessons-and-other-activities)

Catterall, J.S. (1998). Involvement in the arts and success in secondary school. Americans for the Arts Monographs, 1(9), 1-10.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/involvement-in-the-arts-and-success-in-secondary-school)

Arts literacy leads to civic engagement and lifelong arts participation.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Heath, S., & Roach, A. (1999). Imaginative actuality: Learning in the arts during nonschool hours. Chapter in E. Fiske (Ed.), Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning. Washington DC: Arts Education Partnership and President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 19-34.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/imaginative-actuality-learning-in-the-arts-during-nonschool-hours)

Stevenson, L. M. (2011). Creating destiny: Youth, arts and social change. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/creating-destiny-youth-arts-and-social-change)

Catterall, J. S., Dumais, S. A., & Hampden-Thompson, G. (2012). The arts and achievement in at-risk youth: Findings from four longitudinal studies. Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Arts.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-arts-and-achievement-in-at-risk-youth-findings-from-four-longitudinal-studies)

Rabkin, N. and Hedberg, E. (2011). Arts education in America: What the declines mean for arts participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #52. Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Arts.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/arts-education-in-america-what-the-declines-mean-for-arts-participation)

Better Educated:

Arts literate students consistently have higher test scores in reading and math.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Joseph, A. (2014). The Effects of Creative Dramatics on Vocabulary Achievement of Fourth Grade Students in a Language Arts Classroom: An Empirical Study. Seattle Pacific University.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-effects-of-creative-dramatics-on-vocabulary-achievement-of-fourth-grade-students-in-a-language-arts-classroom-an-empirical-study)

Podlozny, A. (2000). Strengthening verbal skills through the use of classroom drama: A clear link. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 34(3-4), 239-276.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/strengthening-verbal-skills-through-the-use-of-classroom-drama-a-clear-link)

Walker, E., Tabone, C. & Weltsek, G. (2011). When achievement data meet drama and arts integration. Language Arts, 88(5), 365-372.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/when-achievement-data-meet-drama-and-arts-integration)

Ingram, D., & Riedel, E., (2003). Arts for Academic Achievement: What does arts integration do for students? University of Minnesota: Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement, College of Education and Human Development.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/arts-for-academic-achievement-what-does-arts-integration-do-for-students)

Tierney, Adam and Krizman, J. and Kraus, N. (2015) Music training alters the course of adolescent auditory development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112 (32), pp. 10062-10067. ISSN 0027-8424.

(http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/12456/6/Adolescence_training_revised.pdf)

Harris, M. A. (2007). Differences in mathematics scores between students who receive traditional Montessori instruction and students who receive music enriched Montessori instruction. Journal for Learning through the Arts, 3(1).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/differences-in-mathematics-scores-between-students-who-receive-traditional-montessori-instruction-and-students-who-receive-music-enriched-montessori-instruction)

Kinney, D. W. & Forsythe, J. L. (2005). The effects of the arts IMPACT curriculum upon student performance on the Ohio fourth-grade proficiency test. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 164, 35-48.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-effects-of-the-arts-impact-curriculum-upon-student-performance-on-the-ohio-fourth-grade-proficiency-test)

Courey, S., Balogh, E., Siker, J., Paik, J. (2012). Academic Music: Music Instruction to Engage Third Grade Students in Learning Basic Fraction Concepts. Educational Studies in Mathematics.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/academic-music-music-instruction-to-engage-third-grade-students-in-learning-basic-fraction-concepts)

Smithrim, K., & Upitis, R. (2005). Learning through the Arts: Lessons of Engagement. Canadian Journal of Education, 28(1/2), 109-127.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/learning-through-the-arts-lessons-of-engagement)

Arts literate students consistently have better attendance in School K-12.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Barry, N. H. (2010). Oklahoma A+ Schools: What the research tells us 2002-2007. Volume three, quantitative measures. Oklahoma A+ Schools/University of Central Oklahoma.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/oklahoma-a-schools-what-the-research-tells-us-2002-2007-volume-three-quantitative-measures)

Brouillette, L., Childress-Evans, K., Hinga, B. & Farkas, G. (2014). Increasing the school engagement and oral language skills of ELLs through arts integration in the primary grades. Journal of Learning through the Arts, 10(1).

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/increasing-the-school-engagement-and-oral-language-skills-of-ells-through-arts-integration-in-the-primary-grades)

Eason, B. J. A., & Johnson, C. M. (2013). Prelude: Music Makes Us baseline research report. Nashville, TN: Metro Nashville Public Schools.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/prelude-music-makes-us-baseline-research-report)

Stoelinga, S.R., Silk, Y., Reddy, P., and Rahman, N. (2015). Turnaround Arts Initiative Final Evaluation Report. President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

(http://pcah.gov/sites/default/files/Turnaround%20Arts_Full%20Report_Single%20Page%20Spread_Low%20Resolution.pdf)

Students who have studied arts are more likely to pursue and succeed at post-secondary education.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Elpus, K. (2013). Arts education and positive youth development: Cognitive, behavioral, and social outcomes of adolescents who study the arts. National Endowment for the Arts.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/arts-education-and-positive-youth-development-cognitive-behavioral-and-social-outcomes-of-adolescents-who-study-the-arts)

Catterall, J. S., Dumais, S. A., & Hampden-Thompson, G. (2012). The arts and achievement in at-risk youth: Findings from four longitudinal studies. Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Arts.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/the-arts-and-achievement-in-at-risk-youth-findings-from-four-longitudinal-studies)

Catterall, James S. (2009). Doing well and doing good by doing art: The effects of education in the visual and performing arts on the achievements and values of young adults. Los Angeles/London: Imagination Group/I-Group Books.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/doing-well-and-doing-good-by-doing-art-the-effects-of-education-in-the-visual-and-performing-arts-on-the-achievements-and-values-of-young-adults)

Elpus, Kenneth (2014). Arts education as a pathway to college: college admittance, selectivity, and completion by arts and non-arts students. National Endowment for the Arts.

(https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/Research-Art-Works-Maryland2.pdf)

Arts literate students are engaged and motivated.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Barry, N. H. (2010). Oklahoma A+ Schools: What the research tells us 2002-2007. Volume three, quantitative measures. Oklahoma A+ Schools/University of Central Oklahoma.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/oklahoma-a-schools-what-the-research-tells-us-2002-2007-volume-three-quantitative-measures)

Ingram, D., & Meath, M. (2007). Arts for academic achievement: A compilation of evaluation findings from 2004-2006. Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/arts-for-academic-achievement-a-compilation-of-evaluation-findings-from-2004-2006)

Respress, T., & Lutfi, G. (2006). Whole brain learning: The fine arts with students at risk. Reclaiming Children & Youth, 15(1), 24-31

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/whole-brain-learning-the-fine-arts-with-students-at-risk)

Walker, E., Tabone, C. & Weltsek, G. (2011). When achievement data meet drama and arts integration. Language Arts, 88(5), 365-372.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/when-achievement-data-meet-drama-and-arts-integration)

Arts literate students have deep critical thinking skills.
ART=OPPORTUNITY

Heath, S. B., Soep, E., & Roach A. (1998). Living the arts through language-learning: A report on community-based youth organizations. American for the Arts Monographs, 2.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/living-the-arts-through-language-learning-a-report-on-community-based-youth-organizations)

Montgomerie, D., & Ferguson, J. (1999). Bears don't need phonics: An examination of the role of drama in laying the foundations for critical thinking in the reading process. Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance, 4(1), 11 - 20.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/bears-don-t-need-phonics-an-examination-of-the-role-of-drama-in-laying-the-foundations-for-critical-thinking-in-the-reading-process)

Winner, E., Hetland, L., Veenema, S., Sheridan, K., Palmer, P., Locher, I., et al. (2006). Studio thinking: How visual arts teaching can promote disciplined habits of mind. New directions in aesthetics, creativity, and the arts, 189-205.

(http://www.artsedsearch.org/summaries/studio-thinking-how-visual-arts-teaching-can-promote-disciplined-habits-of-mind)

Who is involved in this campaign?

The ART=OPPORTUNITY campaign is implemented by Merryl Goldberg, Director, Center ARTES at California State University San Marcos, with a leadership team of arts educators, professionals and area nonprofits. The campaign includes several key components including summits for stakeholders, community anchor events celebrating arts literacy, leadership training for arts advocacy, and the development of certificates for individuals in arts integration and arts education leadership.

ART=OPPORTUNITY builds upon important work supporting arts in education ongoing in San Diego County (and beyond). Local partners and stakeholders include San Diego County Office of Education, the Center for Leadership Innovation and Mentorship Building (CLIMB) in the College of Business Administration at CSUSM, San Marcos Writing Project at CSUSM, School of Arts at CSUSM, North County Professional Development Federation, San Diego Arts Network, San Diego Unified School District’s Learning Through the Arts program, Chula Vista Elementary School District VAPA, Arts for Learning San Diego, La Jolla Playhouse, The New Children’s Museum, A Reason to Survive (ARTS), California Center for the Arts, Escondido and more. We want to include you.

How can I help?

Attend a Summit or Special Event

Adopt the ART=OPPORTUNITY logo and place it on your social media, letterhead, and other communication pieces you have.

Encourage others in your community to participate

Get engaged in our online community and stay updated on upcoming events and news. Share your own successes and involvement in Art=Opportunity on your social media platforms.

Sign up for professional development opportunities and classes beginning next summer/fall focusing on arts literacy, and leadership in arts education advocacy.

Website: www.csusm.edu/centerartes

Facebook: NEED Twitter: Art = Opportunity @NEED Arts for Learning @arts4learningSD Stuart Foundation @Stuart_FND Arts Empower @ArtsEmpowerSD

Who are among the Leaders in Arts Education in San Diego and the state?

San Diego is rich with arts education advocates, providers, and supporters. We aim support the work of numerous organizations already in existence including: San Diego County Office of Education: Arts Empower – A coalition of nonprofit arts education organizations and school districts to champion strategic planning at the district level for K-12 sequential-based arts education. https://artsempowersd.sdcoe.net/

San Diego County Office of Education with Arts For Learning: AERO (Arts Education Resource Organization) AERO San Diego is a community of arts organizations that collaborate to provide resources for educators, arts organizations and artists to ensure an arts-inclusive curriculum for San Diego County students. https://aerosd.sdcoe.net/

California Alliance for Arts Education – statewide advocacy for quality, equitable and accessible arts education for all K-12 public school students http://www.artsed411.org/

CREATE CA - statewide cross-sector arts education coalition to convene, coordinate, communicate and connect around arts education issues. http://www.createca.dreamhosters.com/

Other resources:

Arts Education Partnership
aep-arts.org

ArtsEdSearch
artsedsearch.org

Americans for the Arts research hub
http://www.americansforthearts.org/research