Mass Media Courses

(MMP) = Mass Media Production
(MOS) = Media Organizations and Systems
(MUE) = Media Uses and Effects

MASS 302 Media Production and Context (3)
Introduction to the critical study of media representation and digital video production. Students will learn critical media literacy aimed at analyzing mainstream representations of Otherness while exploring the concepts of voice, style and structure using alternative productions that challenge dominant images. Students will make short media productions in which they turn the critical lens on the Other-izers by occupying and interrogating producer, subject and audience positions. Students will also explore content around identity by creating analytical media memoirs about aspects of their personal history.

MASS 303 Mass Media and Technology (3)
A critical and historical examination of 19th, 20th, and 21st century analog and digital mass media/communication technologies. Introduces the role of media technology in human creative activity and examines the contexts in which new technologies come into use. Students will examine economic and political issues that have (and do) influence the selection of some technologies and standards over others. Students may have the opportunity to create media projects applying course concepts.

MASS 304 Global Media (3)
An exploration of "globalization" as an historical - as well as a contested - process, and of cultural, social, technological economic political processes at work in "mass media globalization". Case studies link discussions of specific forms (i.e., music, radio, video, journalism, internet/web cell phones, broadcast satellites, and points of origin) to old and new audiences. These case studies are contextualized in a consideration of specific communication processes associated with trade, war, community development, policy making and reform, and privatization/deregulation.

MASS 306 Media Distribution: National and International (3)
Examines the distribution of media products, and focuses on identifying and critiquing distribution patterns, structures, practices, and the institutions that offer mediated experience. Highlights two parallel trends in the context of technological advances and convergences: consolidation of mass media industries, and the simultaneous empowerment of independent and guerilla distribution. Students will be able to examine and work within a number of distributor models and strategies including grass-roots/community media, self-publishing, viral marketing, festivals, tradeshows, pod and web casting, and learn about the communication processes used to create distribution networks. (MUE, MOS, MPP)

MASS 315A The News: Print Journalism (3)
Introduces students to print journalism, specifically news writing and reporting. The fundamentals of journalism (e.g., accuracy, objectivity and fairness, interviewing, etc.), basic news writing skills (e.g., AP style), and reporting skills (e.g., database research) are presented. May also examine the development, technologies, professions, and conventions of print journalism. Students will have the opportunity to submit stories related to a campus or local beat to The Pride, the university newspaper. May be repeated for up to nine (9) units of credit, six (6) of which may be applied to the Mass Media major as major electives. (MOS, MMP)

MASS 315B The News: Electronic Journalism (3)
Examines the development, technologies, professions, and conventions of news in regard to film, radio, TV, and the WWW. Explains the processing of information during the creation of broadcast news. Considers various influences on electronic journalism. Compares electronic and print journalism. Students have the opportunity to create media projects applying course concepts, and to submit stories related to a campus or local beat to the university newspaper's web news site. Prerequisite: MASS 315A or consent of instructor. (2nd of 2 semester sequence) (MMP, MOS)

MASS 322 Media Power (3)
Illustrates how media power operates in culture through discourse in local and global contexts. Students examine the power dynamics among producers, subjects and audiences in and around mass media: who makes what for whom and how. Readings and discussions will explore power-inflected relations in mass media, along with discovering possibilities in how to reclaim media power. What happens when historical Others make work about themselves, their cultures and communities? (MUE, MOS)

MASS 324 Media Effects (3)
Explores theories and methods used in scholarly and commercial industrial research on media uses, interpretations and effects. Focus on communication structures, contexts and processes that influence the connections between receiving information, constructing meaning and attitudes and individual and social behavior. Students may have the opportunity to create media projects applying course concepts. (MUE)

MASS 405 Special Topics in Film (1-4)
Topics vary by semester. Students have the opportunity to create media projects applying course concepts (MMP, MUE, MOS)

MASS 424 Media Genres (3)
Examines how media production participants develop products that fit common formats (e.g., sitcoms, soaps, heavy metal, rap, action films, comedies); how production participants and audiences develop recognition and understandings of genres and their conventions; and how production processes differ for various formats. Students consider the persistence and change of common cultural forms. Students have the opportunity to create media projects applying course concepts. Prerequisite: MASS 302 or consent of instructor. [COMM 400 may be substituted for this course] (MMP)

MASS 430 Topics in Mass Media Production (1-4)
Focused study on a specific aspect of mass media production. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. (MMP)

MASS 431 Politics and Practices of Editing (3)
This course is an introduction to the history and development of motion picture editing. During the course, students will have many opportunities to hone their creative and technical skills in editorial choices for the moving image. This subject, which is the first editing course taken by students in the Communication Department, aims to provide students with proficient and creative use of the digital editing station as well as analytical skills in the politics of editing strategies. All work will be discussed from historical, aesthetic, theoretical, and technical points of view. We will look at a varied large template of non-fiction and fiction films and videos and discuss their associated meaning via juxtaposition of sound and image relationships.

MASS 432 Media Narrative (3)
This course explores narrative within traditional and modern media communications. Students examine story structure in newspaper and TV reportage, comic books, fiction film, reality television, web content, and computer gaming. Coursework develops critical ability to understand how various narratives create hegemonic or alternative models of the world, and gives students the tools to express themselves powerfully in any media.

MASS 433 Screenwriting (3)
Explores the theory and practice of feature-length screenwriting and narrative, as commonly seen in fiction film and television, as well as in creative documentaries. Through theory and workshop sessions, this course examines structure, archetypes, character, theme, plot, conflict, action, and dialogue. Students create scenes and outlines, analyzing and revising their own original feature-length stories.
Recommended that students take MASS 432, Media Narrative first, but not required.

MASS 450 Topics in Media Organizations and Systems (1-4)
Focused study on a specific aspect of media organizations and systems. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. (MOS)

MASS 451 Media, Religion, Popular Culture (3)
A study of the theoretical foundations and the process of constructing religiosity and spirituality on electronic media. Explores construction of religiosity in religious media. Examines construction of spirituality in secular media. Investigates the commodification of religiosity and spirituality in popular culture. (MUE)

MASS 452 Media Ethics (3)
Examination of ethical standards and practices of the mass media. Focuses on the conduct as a future media practitioner and the impact students will have on others in particular and society in general. Includes development of ethical decision-making skills.  (MUE)

MASS 456 Media Critique (3)
Critical analysis of a variety of modes of production and explores alternative options. Devoting considerable critical attention to the relationship between production practices and the texts which result from them, students will hone their technical, aesthetic, and media literacy skills by producing one media project. The instruction will be conceptually based and reflects on media styles as well as offering students the opportunity to critique each other's work. Prerequisite: MASS 302 or consent of instructor. (MMP)

MASS 457 Video Studio Production (3)
Focuses on integrating political and social analysis with studio production. Discussions of community-based media and independent media makers will be used in creating alternatives to corporate commercial media. The course provides the technical means and creative encouragement to make alternative studio productions. All work will be produced in the studio and transmitted to on and off-campus audiences while encouraging dialogue about difference and power, media representation and reception. Prerequisite: MASS 302 or consent of instructor. (MMP)

MASS 460 Political Economy of Mass Media (3)
Theories and problems concerning systems of support and control of the mass media, with special reference to the role of special interest groups and the political state. Emphasis on allocations of spectrum, time, money, energy, materials, and human resources among agencies of mass communication systems. Consideration is given to questions of access to media institutions and the operations of such institutions in light of governmental regulations and policies. Some focus on the significance of mass communication in conducting foreign affairs, as well as the role of mass communication in developing nations. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for COMM 460. (MOS)

MASS 470 Topic in Mass Media (1-4)
Focuses on a specific aspect of mass media which involves mass media production and/or media organization and systems and/or media uses and effects. Topics vary by semester. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of individual topics and the areas (MUE, MOS and/or MMP). May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units.

MASS 480 Topics in Media Uses and Effects (3)
Focused study on a specific aspect of media uses and effects. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. Topics vary by semester. (MUE)

MASS 490 Capstone Project (3)
Students plan, develop, and complete a mass media production (MMP) or research project that includes multimedia materials (MOS, MUE). Capstone Projects will integrate the particular areas of study that students have emphasized during their respective upper-division careers. Prerequisites: Senior status and completion of all Mass Media required courses. (MUE, MOS, MMP)
More information on Mass 490 Capstone Project

MASS 495 Mass Media Internship (3)
May be used by students who have found opportunities for practical work experience in mass media enterprises. Students will write a paper analyzing their work experience in the context of concepts studied in other Mass Media courses. Number of units to be decided by the instructor. MASS 495 and MASS 499 may total no more than six (6) units applied toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MASS 499 Independent Study (1-3)
May be used by students who desire to do individualized projects with a professor. Number of units to be decided by the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. MASS 495 and MASS 499 may total no more than six (6) units applied toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.