Course Descriptions: Undergraduate and Graduate Psychology Courses

PSYC 100 (3)
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to basic concepts, problems, and research methods in the science of psychology. Includes perception, cognitive processes, learning, motivation, measurement, development, personality, abnormal behavior, and biological and social bases of behavior, including cross-cultural issues. The requirements will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers.

PSYC 104 (3)
Psychology for Living
Psychological principles, theory, and research are discussed in the context of applied situations and self-improvement. Areas covered include stress and anger management, sexuality and relationship issues, drug abuse, choosing a career, improving study and test-taking skills, changing unwanted behaviors, parenting concerns, and selecting mental health services.

PSYC 110 (3)
Critical Thinking in Psychology
An introduction to critical thinking skills as they are applied in the science of psychology. Basic critical thinking skills covered include logical inferences and fallacies, distinguishing fact from opinion, scientific reasoning and interpreting research findings. Emphasis will be on using critical thinking skills to examine a number of contemporary issues involving human behavior, such as hypnosis, ESP, subliminal perception, persuasion and propaganda, drug legalization, AIDS prevention, and the effects of television

PSYC 210 (3)
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
An introductory survey course that utilizes a chronological approach to examine human development from birth through adolescence. Includes a study of physical development and health; developmental issues of children with special needs; cognitive and moral development; social and personality development; and genetic, sociocultural, and other influences on development.

PSYC 215 (3)
Psychosocial Influences on Child Development
Study of child and adolescent development within the psychosocial worlds of family, school, and community. Bidirectional effects and interactions among these influences will be explored. Age, gender, diverse abilities, ethnicity, socioeconomic, and public factors that affect development of values, attitudes, morals, and behavior of children and youth will be considered within an ecological framework.

PSYC 220 (3)
Introductory Statistics in Psychology
Basic statistical methods for analysis of data in psychology; descrip¬tive and inferential statistics; hypothesis testing; parametric tests of significance. Introduction to linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance; nonparametric techniques. The requirements will include partic¬ipation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activities.

PSYC 230 (3)
Research Methods in Psychology
The fundamentals of research methods in psychology. Focus will be on issues of reliability, validity, and ethical considerations in conducting research with humans and animals. Participation in designing and conducting experiments, data analysis and interpretation, and preparation of research reports. The requirements will include participation in low-risk psychological experiments or completion of additional short papers. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 220 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 231 (1)
Psychology Research Methods Laboratory
Introduces students to the basics of statistical software; date collec¬tion, entry, and analysis; and report writing. Students will actively participate in the research process and apply what was learned in their research methods class. The fundamentals learned in this class will prepare students for upper-division psychology lab courses. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, and a lecture-only research methods course with grades of C (2.0) or better. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PSYC 230; (this course is for transfer students who did not have a lab component in their lower-division research methods course.)

PSYC 300 (3)
Computer Applications in Psychology
Exploration of the application of computer technology to the scientific study of behavior, including new and emerging technologies for psycho¬logical research, software and statistical packages, computer ethics, and professional report writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 220 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 310 (3)
Theories of Developmental Psychology
Provides an overview of theories of child and adolescent development and examines the ways in which theory informs research and practice in dealing with children and adolescents. Examines application of the major theories, discusses strengths and weaknesses of each, and places their development in historical and cultural context. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 210, and 215 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 328 (3)
Developmental Psychopathology
Causes and effects of various psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence are examined from an integrative perspective that addresses biological, genetic, family, social, and cultural influences as well as individual processes including cognition, emotion, attachment, moral development, gender, and sexuality. Diagnoses, treatments, and interventions are covered as well as comorbidities and developmental norms. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 210 or PSYC 100 and 330 and 348.

PSYC 330 (3)
Developmental Psychology: Infancy and Childhood
Theories, methods and research on development from conception through childhood. Includes biological, genetic, and physical develop¬ment; social-emotional development, cognitive and language develop¬ment; perception and brain development. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 332 (3)
Social Psychology
Study of individuals and groups as they are affected by social interac¬tions. Subjects include social influence (conformity, obedience), attitudes and attitude change, attraction, altruism, aggression, social perception and cognition, interpersonal influence, and group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 333 (3)
Psychology of Prejudice
Examines psychological theory and research on prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping from the perspectives of both the holders and targets of prejudice. In particular, the course emphasizes the cognitive, motiva¬tional, and social bases of prejudice, racism, sexism, as well as prejudice reduction. May not be taken by students who have received credit for PSYC 440J. Completion of the Lower-Division General Education require¬ment in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 334 (3)
Psychology of Personality
Theory and assessment techniques in personality research. Subject matter includes study of personality structure, development, personality dynamics, and determinants of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 100

PSYC 336 (3)
Abnormal Psychology
Causes, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders. Regular visits to local psychiatric facilities may be required. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 338 (3)
Environmental Psychology
Examines human behaviors associated with environmental problems, including global warming, ozone depletion, acid rain, destruction of the rainforests, and depletion of natural resources. Covers such subjects as the commons dilemma, rational choice, values, and incentives. Examines interventions designed to change human behavior such as conservation, public transportation, recycling, and environmental education. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 340 (3)
Survey of Clinical Psychology
Introduction to the field of clinical psychology with an emphasis on the application and evaluation of techniques of individual and group counseling and therapy. Includes methods, diagnosis, research, therapeutic techniques, educational and professional requirements, ethics. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and PSYC 336.

PSYC 341 (3)
Multicultural Perspectives in Psychology
Theory and research in the study of psychosocial issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, both in the U.S. and elsewhere. Subject matter includes examining the relationship of race, culture, and social class in psychological development and discussing the research implications for the multicultural study of psychology. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 342 (3)
Group Dynamics
Study of small group behavior and team effectiveness. Examines subjects such as group membership, systems theory, communica¬tion, group decision-making, group development and performance, and conflict management. Focuses on diverse perspectives in organizations and work groups. Cross-cultural work settings, and gender differences in leadership and group behavior. Theory and research about group dynamics will be applied to organizational, educational, and counseling settings. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 343 (3)
Psychology of Work and the Family
Focuses on the impact of parental employment on the physical, cognitive, and socioeconomic development of children and adolescents. Subjects will include parental labor force participation, work/family conflict and balance, effects of employment and daycare, and cross-cultural, ethnic, and social class differences. Additionally, the course will address “family friendly organizations” and how businesses are responding to work-family issues. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education Area D.

PSYC 344 (3)
Positive Psychology
Examines psychological theory and research on the study of optimal human functioning and what makes life worth living. Focuses on such topics as happiness, strengths, hope, forgiveness, wisdom, and gratitude. Covers core assumptions, measurement techniques, research findings, and practical applications and interventions. Students have the opportunity to evaluate their well-being, strengths, and limitations, and learn ways to apply positive psychology to important domains in their lives and in the lives of the people with whom they interact. May not be taken by students who have received credit for PSYC 440K. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D)

PSYC 346 (3)
Principles of Behavior Change
An examination of theories and methods of behavioral change. Focuses on behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches to making positive changes in human behavior. Includes social learning theory and the application of learning principles to psychological and behavioral problems. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 336, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 348 (3)
Developmental Psychology: Adolescence
Addresses the theories, methods, and research on the development of adolescence (ages 10-22). It emphasizes empirical research on physical, cognitive, and social development and considers the gender, ethnic and socioeconomic differences found in such development. Subjects include the timing of pubertal development, teen pregnancy, parent-adoles¬cent relations, identity development, peer relations, the transition to adulthood, and adolescent psychopathology (suicide, depression, eating disorders). Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 350 (3)
Psychology of Women
Theories and research in the study of the psychological characteristics of women in the social contexts of culture, class, and race, including sex and gender similarities and differences, the construction of gender roles, stereotypes, intimacy, work and achievement, motherhood, violence against women, mental and emotional adjustment, and aging. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 352 (3)
Human Sexuality
Examines physical, intrapsychic, and interpersonal aspects of sexuality; also anatomical, physiological, and emotional aspects, love and attraction, sexual dysfunction treatment, sexually transmitted diseases, sex and aging, legal aspects of sexual behavior, sexual exploitation, and eroticism in American culture. Presentations will be frank and explicit. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 353 (3)
Psychology in the Workplace: Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Current psychological principles and traditional theories in industry and work organizations. Selection, placement, training, and motivation of people in work situations. Environmental and human influences, system safety, and organizational development. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PSYC 418. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 354 (3)
Educational Psychology: Psychological Perspectives
An introduction to psychological research and theory on how instruction affects student learning. Learning, motivation, development, individual differences, psychological aspects of the classroom, and evaluation as related to the educative process. Credit may not be counted toward programs in the School of Education. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 356 (3)
Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Aging
Theories and research in adult development and aging. Includes cognitive, social, psychological, and physical development; vocational and family changes, retirement, successful and unsuccessful adjustment patterns. Issues of gender, social class, and racial/ethnic factors, and their impact on aging will be covered extensively. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 360 (3)
Biopsychology
Introduction to the biological bases of behavior, including material central to physiological psychology, comparative psychology, behavioral genetics, and sensory psychology. Issues to be addressed include but are not limited to neuroethology, behavioral endocrinology, evolutionary theory, sociobiology, and sensory systems. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or BIOL 211.

PSYC 361 (3)
Brain and Mind
Examines the relationship between the brain and the behavior produced by the brain. Intended for non-majors, this course will review basic neuroanatomy and physiology, and consider mind/brain relations in the context of psychoactive drugs, brain development, neurological disorders, sexual behavior, and cognitive abilities such as language, memory, thinking, and consciousness. Also offered as BIOL 348. Students may not receive credit for both. May not be counted toward the Psychology Major or Minor. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Life Science (B2).

PSYC 362 (3)
Cognitive Processes
Theoretical and research approaches to the study of thinking, problem-solving, language, concept learning, decision making and judgment, cognitive development, and cognitive structure. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 363 (3)
Drugs, Brain, Behavior and Society
An introduction to the use of drugs in modern society. Emphasizes psychoactive drugs, including psychotherapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse. Explores the effects of drugs on the brain and behavior, psycho¬logical and biological factors responsible for their use and misuse, as well as social, cultural, historical and legal aspects of drug use. The content will range from general principles of drug action to focused information on specific classes of drugs. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of the Lower-Division General Education requirement in Discipline-specific or Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (D).

PSYC 391 (3)
Laboratory in Physiological Psychology
Advanced research methods in physiological processes underlying brain function and behavior. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as neuroanatomy, physiology, behavioral neuroscience and psychopharmacology. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 360 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 392 (3)
Laboratory in Sensation and Perception
Advanced research methods in sensory and perceptual processes. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as audition and vision. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 360 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 393 (3)
Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
Advanced research methods in human cognitive processes. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as memory and problem-solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 362 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 394 (3)
Laboratory in Comparative Animal Behavior
Advanced research methods in animal behavior, including human behavior. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as predator/prey interactions, communication, aggression, and mating behavior. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory; one or more field trips required. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 360 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 395 (3)
Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
Advanced research methods in life-span developmental psychology. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as cognitive and social development. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and either PSYC 330, 348, or 356 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 396 (3)
Laboratory in Social Psychology
Advanced research methods in social psychology. Application of methodological principles to research in such areas as group interaction and person perception. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230, and 332 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 402 (4)
Psychological Testing
Principles and practices of group and individual testing in aptitude, intelligence, interest, and personality. Theory, construction, evaluation, interpretation, uses, and limits of psychological tests. Reliability, validity, item analysis, norms, and test construction and selection. Ethical, sociocultural, and gender issues in testing. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, 230 with grades of C (2.0) or better. Enrollment Requirement: One upper-division psychology laboratory course.

PSYC 422 (3)
Social Cognition
Critically examines the theories, research, and practical applications centered around the basic issue of how people make sense of other people, themselves, and their social environment. Subject matter covered includes attribution theory, schemas and person perception, self-perception, prejudice and stereotyping, nonverbal communication, and social inference. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 332, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 424 (3)
Advanced Psychological Statistics
Advanced statistical methods for analysis of data in psychology. Sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance techniques. Applications to research design and evaluation of data in psychology. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activities. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 220 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 432 (3)
Health Psychology
Examines areas of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment that may be elucidated by an understanding of psychological concepts and research. Explores the psychological perspective on these areas and considers how the psychological perspective might be enlarged and extended in the health care area. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, 220, and 230 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Enrollment Requirement: Three (3) units of upper-division psychology courses must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 440 (3)
Topics in Psychology
An intensive look at selected areas of psychology. Course description 2vailable before registration in the semester offered. May be repeated for credit as topics change, but only three (3) units may be counted
toward the major. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. Prerequisites: Vary according to the topic.

PSYC 461 (3)
Neuropsychopharmacology
An examination of the ways that drugs affect the brain and behavior. Emphasis on psychoactive drugs, including antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics and drugs of abuse. Although social, cultural and political aspects of drug use will be briefly touched upon, when appropriate, the primary focus of the course will be neurobiological and behavioral effects of the drugs. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 465 (3)
Human Neuropsychology
Principles and practice of human neuropsychology. Material will focus upon basic topics, theory and empirical research concerning human neuroanatomy, brain-behavior relationships, and the clinical application of this knowledge base. Major emphasis will be placed upon disorders of the central nervous system which affect cognitive and emotional processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or 362 must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.

PSYC 490 (3)
History of Psychology
Historical, philosophical, and scientific background of Psychology; major traditions and conceptual issues. This is a capstone course and should be taken by psychology majors in their final semester at CSUSM.
Enrollment Requirement: Completion of nine (9) units of upper-division psychology courses.

PSYC 495 (3)
Field Experience in Psychological Settings
Supervised field experience in on- and off-campus settings which provide psychological services, such as medical settings, mental health clinics, schools, and industry. Students will spend approximately six hours per week in a field placement for observation and participation, attend weekly class meetings, read related material, and prepare written reports. Application forms must be completed prior to enrollment. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied toward the major. Enrollment Requirement: Nine (9) units of upper division psychology courses. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor. Specific sections of this course may carry additional prerequisites.

PSYC 498A (1) 498B (2) 498C (3) 498D (4)
Independent Study
Study plan must be approved by the fourth week of classes. Individual library study (e.g., review of literature) under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied toward the major. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.  For more information, see the FAQ for Independent Study/Research.

PSYC 499A (1) 499B (2) 499C (3) 499D (4)
Independent Research
Study plan must be approved by the fourth week of classes. Independent research investigation (e.g., empirical laboratory or field research) in collaboration with a faculty member. May be repeated, but no more than three (3) units of credit may be applied toward the major. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of at least one upper-division laboratory course in psychology. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.  For more information, see the FAQ for Independent Study/Research.

PSYC 520 (3)
Graduate Statistics
Introduction to theory and application of some of the more advanced parametric and nonparametric statistical techniques employed in psychological research. Topics will include but are not limited to multiple regression, analysis of covariance, factor analysis, causal modeling, and discriminant function analysis. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activities. Prerequisite: PSYC 424. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

PSYC 530 (3)
Advanced Research Methods
Advanced study of research design, including experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental designs, assessment of reliability and validity, and ethical use of human and animal subjects in research. Prerequisite: PSYC 424 or 520. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

PSYC 550 (3)
Proseminar in Social/ Personality Psychology
An exploration of research and theory in social and personality psychology. Advanced study of theories of personality and individual differences, social perception, group processes, attitudes, and the application of personality and social psychological theories across a variety of social, institutional, and cultural settings. A substantial portion of class time is devoted to the critical examination of current research articles and theoretical models in social/ personality psychology. Students will make formal oral and written presentations of individual or group projects/assignments. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 552 (3)
Proseminar in Developmental Psychology
Advanced study of current research and theory in developmental psychology. Issues such as temperament, attachment, gender-identity, cognition, and emotion will be considered from a developmental perspec¬tive, as well as the influences of family relationships, social interactions, cultural values, education, and social policy on development. Class discussions and assignments will encourage critical and analytic thinking as well as active learning approaches. Students will make formal oral and written presentations of individual and/or group projects. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 554 (3)
Proseminar in Cognitive Psychology
Advanced study of human cognition. Focuses on theory and research in areas such as attention, categorization, memory, knowledge represen¬tation, learning and skill acquisition, psychology of language, thinking, reasoning, problem-solving, and judgment. Relevant issues in neuropsychology, cognitive development, and cognitive disorders will be included to complement the focus on normal adult performance. The role of culture in cognitive activity will be discussed. Discussions and assign-ments will center around a critical examination of current literature in these areas, including both integrative and interdisciplinary (cognitive science) perspectives. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 556 (3)
Proseminar in Comparative/Physiological Psychology
Advanced study of the biological bases of behavior. Critical examination of current research articles and theoretical models in one or more areas of biological psychology such as neuroanatomy and physiology, psycho¬pharmacology, endocrinology, evolutionary theory, and the adaptive signif¬icance of behavior. Students will make formal oral and written presenta¬tions of individual or group projects. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 558 (3)
Proseminar in Counseling/ Clinical Psychology
In-depth seminar designed to investigate and discuss current topics in counseling/ clinical psychology, including assessment and interven¬tion techniques, professional ethics, multicultural issues, and outcome research. Students will present formal written and oral presentations and lead class discussions of advanced issues relevant to counseling/clinical theory, research, or practice. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 560 (3)
Selected Topics in Psychology
Examination of a topic of current interest in a specific area of psychology. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 600 (3)
Contemporary Issues in Psychology
Students will receive exposure to theoretical background, current research, and contemporary issues in counseling/clinical, cognitive, comparative/physiological, developmental, and social/ personality psychology. Presentations will be given by faculty, second year graduate students, and guest speakers in their fields of expertise. Professional issues including ethics in psychological research and practice, the dissemination of scholarly discourse, the status and coherence of the discipline, and its role in a multicultural, global society will also be explored. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the psychology graduate program.

PSYC 680 (3)
Teaching of Psychology
An introduction to pedagogical theories, styles, and strategies as they apply to college teaching of psychology. Students will explore a range of options available to a college instructor in the presentation of course material, learning assessment tools, test construction, and grading. Different styles of learning, especially as they may apply to a multicultural student population, will be explored. Students will have the opportu¬nity to write and practice giving lectures, lead mock discussion groups, and construct mock exams. Students must enroll in PSYC 680 in the first semester of their second year of study. Graded Credit/No Credit. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of fifteen (15) units in the graduate program. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

PSYC 681 (3)
Field Placement
Students will spend a minimum of ten hours per week working within a social service, mental health, educational or business/industry setting, with the goal of applying psychological knowledge to and learning about the delivery of services in that setting. Students will be supervised both on site, and by the course instructor. Students enrolled in the course will meet three hours per week as a group to discuss issues and readings relevant to their experiences. Graded Credit/No Credit. Enrollment Requirement: Completion of nine (9) units in the graduate program. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor

PSYC 690 (3)
Graduate Research
Faculty-supervised research. May be repeated, but no more than six (6) units of credit may be applied toward the Master’s degree. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

PSYC 699 (3)
Graduate Thesis
Preparation of the thesis. Graded Credit/No Credit. Enrollment Restriction: Approved thesis proposal, and completion of eighteen (18) units in the graduate program. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of thesis advisor.

PSYC 700A (1) 700B (2) 700C (3)
Thesis Extension
Registration in this course is limited to students who have received a grade of Report in Progress (RP) in PSYC 699. May be repeated. Graded Credit/No Credit. Enrollment Requirement: Prior registration in PSYC 699 with an assigned grade of Report in Progress (RP).

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