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Establishing an Endowed Professorship

Learn more about building a lasting legacy through planned giving. Contact University Advancement at 760-750-4031.

Building a Legacy that Lasts

Glen Brodowsky, Marketing Professor for the College of Business Administration

Glen Brodowsky, Marketing Professor for the College of Business Administration

Passionate about education and inspired by the deep-rooted innovative spirit of CSUSM, Marketing Professor Glen Brodowsky has ensured that his legacy will continue on in perpetuity at the University through his charitable bequest of real estate. It is his intention that assets from his Idyllwild home will one day transfer through his will and establish an endowed professorship in his name.

"I believe in higher education and I am committed to the mission of our University, so I'm putting my money where my mouth is," he said. "You need to invest in what you believe in, and I believe in CSUSM."

Endowed faculty support will allow CSUSM to recruit and retain high-quality, distinguished faculty by offering competitive packages that attract and retain internationally-recognized scholars. Permanent endowed funds provide perpetual annual income - using the income earned from a philanthropic gift - to support the teaching and research activities of the professorship. Endowments represent an investment in the future of CSUSM while recognizing a donor's generosity in perpetuity.

"Supporting the University through a planned gift allows me to enjoy what I have while alive and then apply it to an area I'm passionate about when I no longer have use for that asset," he added. "It's like giving something without sacrifice."

I believe in higher education and I am committed to the mission of our University, so I'm putting my money where my mouth is, you need to invest in what you believe in, and I believe in CSUSM.

Glen Brodowsky,
Marketing Professor for the College of Business Administration

A leading global expert in cross-cultural marketing, Brodowsky has lived and worked in China, Japan, Denmark and Taiwan, and his research has been published in prestigious national and international journals. He began teaching at CSUSM in 1996, and has held numerous positions during his tenure including department chair, academic senator and vice chair of the CSU Faculty Affairs Committee.

For nearly two decades Brodowsky has been generously supporting the University, contributing to special projects and on-going annual needs. His long-standing involvement in the President's Circle has increased student scholarships and helped to enrich CSUSM. When Markstein Hall, the flagship building for the University's business program, opened in 2006, Brodowsky purchased the naming rights to his new office in memory of his grandmother who inspired him to learn Mandarin Chinese. His latest decision to bequest his property demonstrates the power and flexibility estate planning can have in fulfilling philanthropic goals.

"I walk around campus and see my contributions every day," he said. "I see the work I've done and the legacy I've helped build, and through my estate I can ensure the continuation of my work when I'm gone."