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Robert Noyce Teacher Scholars Program

Robert Noyce Teacher Scholars Program

Welcome to the CSUSM Robert Noyce Teacher Scholars Program

The CSUSM Noyce Teacher Scholars program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), responds to the critical need for K-12 teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by encouraging talented STEM students and professionals to pursue teaching careers.

CSUSM Noyce Teacher Scholars program provides scholarships, early teaching experiences, and an alumni network, and is working to develop a STEM summer credential pathway, to increase the number of CSUSM mathematics and science students completing the math or science single subject credential program at CSUSM. Each Noyce Scholar receives a maximum of three years of scholarship support of up to $12,000 per year. Scholarship recipients are required to complete two years of teaching in high-need school districts for each year of financial support.

Note: The Noyce scholarship is available until Spring 2023. Additional funding may or may not be available, pending further grant application outcomes.

Contact Us

noyce@csusm.edu

Link to CSUSM STEM Teachers Instagram

Through this project, STEM undergraduates at CSUSM, MiraCosta, and Palomar will learn about teaching careers, have access to early teaching experiences where they can explore their interest and commitment to teaching, and be able to join a community of Noyce Scholars engaged in further teaching activities and receiving support to finish both a STEM degree and teaching credential.

The CSUSM Noyce program is part of the Western Regional Noyce Network as well as the national network-- check out other Noyce resources at the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program (official) website.

 

Learn about the Noyce Program and Why You Should Be Involved!

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1758492 and 1240124. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.