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LTWR Graduate Student News 

  • Congratulations to the Class of 2020! 

The Graduate Studies Coordinator, Prof. Heidi Breuer, has prepared a short video in celebration of graduating LTWR students. Check it out!

  • Congratulations to Jeremy Whittaker! 

Congratulations to Jeremy Whittaker, who successfully defended his thesis, "Exploring Science-Fantasy, Gender, and Postcolonial Issues in Netflix’s Disenchantment"  which connects previous discussions about gender and race in speculative literature to a recent animated series not currently the subject of academic discussion. Jeremy argues that Disenchantment invites viewers to be critical of traditional speculative literature conventions that rely on gender and racial stereotypes, but that the show ultimately falls prey to some of the very conventions it attempts to critique.

  • Congratulations to Melissa Hurt! 

Congratulations to Melissa Hurt, who successfully defended her thesis,
"(Sub)urbanites Under the Influence: High Crimes and Border Crossings in the Addiction Narratives of Junky and Breaking Bad" which considers how race and class function in contemporary representations of drug addicts. Melissa tracks how the whiteness and class privilege of sympathetic addict characters continue to reinforce the racialized stereotypes about addiction in American culture. This thesis raises important questions about changing drug policies and which populations benefit from recent decriminalization legislation and the role that popular narratives play in forwarding stigmas and stereotypes.

  • Congratulations to Mikayla Keehn!

Congratulations to Mikayla Keehn, who successfully defended her thesis, "Composing Herself: Joan Didion and the Art of Public Bereavement" which unpacks Didion's psychological process of “magical thinking” and elucidates how Didion depicts negotiating feelings of abandonment and denial as she guides her readers into her candid progression into grief, utilizing literature, research, and her writing process to make sense of her identity as a new widow traversing the unfamiliar landscape of bereavement through memory.

  • Congratulations to Jillian Sandvig! 

Congratulations to Jillian Sandvig, who successfully defended her thesis, "'I Wanna Do Bad Things [to] You:' Complicating Representations of Southern Women and Cultural “Others” in Absalom, Absalom! and True Blood"  which examines how issues of gender and race are portrayed in southern gothic works. In particular, Jillian looks at how systemic racial and gender prejudices uniquely tied to the culture of the American south continue to haunt readers and viewers.

  • Congratulations to Andy McIntyre!

Congratulations to Andy McIntyre, who successfully defended his thesis, Tender Eyes!  Andy's creative thesis features a set of nested science fiction stories in the tradition of Ray Bradbury and Issac Asimov, using contemporary technology like AI and VR as his inspiration.

  • Congratulations to Thomas Bricke!

Congratulations to Thom Bricke, who successfully defended his thesis, "Translating Hans Fallada's children's book, Geschichten aus der Murkelei, from German into English". Not only did he render these texts elegantly into idiomatic English, he also preceded the translation with a thoughtful introduction in which he shares his experiences and theoretical insights as a translator.

  • Congratulations to Kerry Baker!

Congratulations to Kerry Baker, who successfully defended her thesis, "Representations of Witches and Witchcraft in Children's Literature," which analyzes the use of witchcraft tropes (such as the hag and the anti-mother) in C. S. Lewis's The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe and Roald Dahl's The Witches, arguing that the villainized witch figures in these stories represent a backlash to 1st- and 2nd-wave British feminism, respectively. 

  • Congratulations to Elizabeth Roush!

Congratulations to Elizabeth Roush, who successfully defended her thesis, "The Subversive Recontextualization of Celebrity Images," which analyzes the way celebrity images--specifically, those of Shirley Temple and Shia LeBeouf--shift meaning through the process of recontextualization.

  • Congratulations to Erica Wahlgren!

Congratulations to Erica Wahlgren, who successfully defended her thesis, "Constructed Landscapes: Impact on Physical Space and Bodily Experience," which was a critical examination of constructed landscapes and the bodies contained/constrained by these spaces, through film, videogames, and national parks.

  • Congratulations to Jen Strawser!

Congratulations to Jen Strawser, who successfully defended her thesis, "Masculine Trauma in William Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury," which uses a psychoanalytic lens to explore how trauma affects the Compson brothers and leaves them unable or unwilling (as the case may be) to abandon pre-Civil War notions of southern white masculinity. 

  • Congratulations to Yaz Manley!

Congrats to Yasmin Manley, who successfully defended her thesis, "Rendered Out of Commission: Othered Arabs and Abject Rhetoric in Service of Empire," which was a critical-creative work that used Foucault, Kristeva, and Said, in conjunction with original creative writing to examine anti-Arab rhetoric and imagery in contemporary culture. 

  • Congratulations to Kristian Pr'Out!

Congrats to Kristian Pr'Out, who successfully defended his thesis, "Egoism and the Post-Anarchic: Max Stirner's New Individualism," which positions Stirner as a post-anarchist by reinterpreting Stirner's critiques of anarchism and liberalism. 

  • Introducing the Schmidt Scholarship for Incoming M.A. Students!

The LTWR Department is thrilled to announce the inauguration of the Schmidt Graduate Scholarship in Literature & Writing Studies, available to incoming students starting in Fall 2018.  Two incoming students will be selected for a $2000 scholarship to be distributed during the first semester of the M.A. program.   

Recent Graduates

Congratulations to our most recent M.A.s, who successfully defended their theses!

Jeremy Whittaker, "Exploring Science-Fantasy, Gender, and Postcolonial Issues in Netflix's Disenchantment", 2020 (directed by Prof. Rebecca Lush)

Melissa Hurt, "(Sub)urbanites Under the Influence: High Crimes and Border Crossings in the Addiction Narratives of Junky and Breaking Bad", 2020 (directed by Prof. Rebecca Lush)

Mikayla Keehn, "Composing Herself: Joan Didion and the Art of Public Bereavement", 2020 (directed by Prof. Martha Stoddard Holmes)

Jillian Sandvig, "'I Wanna Do Bad Things [to] You:' Complicating Representations of Southern Women and Cultural "Others" in Absalom, Absalom! and True Blood", 2020 (directed by Prof. Rebecca Lush)

Andy McIntyre, "Tender Eyes", 2019 (directed by Prof. Heidi Breuer)

Thomas Bricke, "Translating Hans Fallada's children's book, Geschichten aus der Murkelei, from German into English," 2019 (directed by Prof. Oliver Berghof)

Kerry Baker, "Representations of Witches and Witchcraft in Children's Literature," 2019 (directed by Prof. Heidi Breuer)

Elizabeth Roush, "The Subversive Recontextualization of Celebrity Images," 2019 (directed by Prof. Heidi Breuer)

Erica Wahlgren, "Constructed Landscapes: Impact on Physical Space and Bodily Experience," 2019 (directed by Prof. Francesco Levato)

Jen Strawser, "Masculine Trauma in William Faulkner's 'Sound and the Fury'," 2019 (directed by Prof. Mark Wallace)

Yaz Manley, "Rendered Out of Commission: Othered Arabs and Abject Rhetoric in Service of Empire," 2019 (co-directed by Prof. Francesco Levato and Prof. Sandra Doller)

Kristian Pr'Out, "Egoism and the Post-Anarchic: Max Stirner's New Individualism," 2019 (directed by Prof. Oliver Berghof)

David Davis, "Dark Lens: Postcolonial Lovecreaftian Interactive Fiction," 2018 (directed by Prof. Francesco Levato)

Gianna Ramirez, "The Conjuring of Strange Curious Mischief: Twisted Retellings of Classic Children's Narratives," 2018 (directed by Prof. Sandra Doller)

Rebecca Sterling, “Monstrous Journeys: The Horror of the Failed Female Hero’s Journey in Carrie and Ginger Snaps,” 2018 (directed by Prof. Rebecca Lush)  

Joyce Jacobo, "Los Byblos: Thesis Edition," 2017 (co-directed by Prof. Sandra Doller and Prof. Mark Wallace)