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Courses

Undergraduate Courses

All courses are three units unless indicated otherwise.

  • HIST 101 World Civilizations to 1500

     Surveys the history of the world from the early river-valley civilizations to the year 1500. Emphasis upon Afro-Eurasia and the Americas. Subject matter includes politics, society, religion, and global interactions. May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for HIST 201. Meets lower-division general education requirement "C2."
  • HIST 102 World Civilizations to Present

    Surveys the history of the world from the 16th Century to the present. Examines transcultural interactions, colonialism, revolutions, industrializa­tion, the world wars and the origins of the modern world. May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for HIST 202. Meets lower-division general education requirement "C2."
  • HIST 130 U.S. History 1500-1877

    A survey of the development and changing historical interpretation of the American institutions and society from the colonial period through Reconstruction. Special attention to the interplay of European, American Indian, and African cultures in this development. Themes include immigration, colonial formation, Indian-white contact, constitutional development, economic change, religion, slavery, race relations, status of women, westward expansion, reform, and political parties. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 230. Meets lower-division general education requirement "DH."
  • HIST 131 U.S. History 1877-Present

    A survey of the development and the changing historical interpretation of institutions and society in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Special attention to the interplay between races and cultural diversity and conflict. Themes include immigration, constitutional development, politics, economics, religion, reform, the growth of the United States as a world power, status of women, westward expansion, and urbanization. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 231.  Meets lower-division general education requirement "DH."
  • HIST 300 Thematic Topics in History

    Thematic topics in History. Topics may come from any world area or be comparative. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. Students should check the class schedule for listing of actual topics.

    • 300-8: Latin America:Image & Myth. Area: Latin America. Meets Digital History Requirement
    • 300-11: The Spanish Past and the Modern Middle East.  Area: Middle East.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
    • 300-13: The Surprising History of the Fork and Other Strange Objects. Area: U.S.
    • 300-14: Beer in the United States: A Social, Business, and Cultural History. Area: U.S.
    • 300-15: History of the American Presidency. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 301 Historical Methods and Writing

    Offers an introduction to historical methodology and theory. Explores the various approaches historians take to their study and the variety of tools historians use, including digital history. Students will produce an original research project based on primary sources, in engagement with existing historical scholarship.
  • HIST 304A Ancient Rome: City and Empire

    Intensive, three-week, travel-study summer course in the city of Rome. Focuses on the history of ancient Rome through its capital city. Consists of in-class lectures/discussions and visits to sites and museums of histor­ical and cultural interest including the Forum, Colosseum, and Pantheon along with an excursion to Pompeii. Corequisite: HIST 304B. Area: Ancient. Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."
  • HIST 304B The Cultural Legacy of Ancient Rome

    Intensive, three-week, travel-study summer course in the city of Rome, this course will focus on the cultural legacy of ancient Rome up to modern times. Consists of lectures/ discussions and visits to sites and museums of historical and cultural interest, including the Piazza Navona, Trevi Fountain, and the Vatican, along with an excursion to Florence. Corequisite: HIST 304A. 

    Area: Ancient

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 305 Early Industrial Britain, 1688-1850

    Charts the early economic transformation of Britain and its role in shaping issues of politics and constitutional forms; surrounding the developing of class, gender, and social relationships; framing questions of empire and imperial policy; and cultural and intellectual expression. Uses Britain’s industrialization as a case study to isolate structural components of that process within the particular situation found in Britain from 1688-1850. 

    Area: Europe.

    Requirement: Pre-1500.

  • HIST 306 History of Internationalism & Human Rights

    A course in intellectual history that considers the history behind the idea of human rights in the modern world. Explores how historical ideas about universalism and human nature from the 18th century forward led to challenges to the nation-state system as the dominant model of international society. Subjects include abolitionist movements, anti-imperialism, self-determination and humanitarian agencies, with special emphasis on the League of Nations, United Nations, and the challenges that human rights pose to questions of national sovereignty. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for 300G.

    Area: Comparative/Transnational.

  • HIST 307 The Politics of Irish Nationalism

    Presents Irish History both as case study in European nationalist movements and as model for British colonial/ imperial relations. Examines impact of nationalism and colonialism on state-building, economic development and cultural/intellectual life. Particular emphasis on relationship between nationalist movements, colonial policy, and political violence. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300B. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 308 National Cinema & National History in 20th Century Europe

    Explores the history of how European national identities were created, defined and sustained in the 20th Century through the new medium of motion pictures. Examines the creation of national cinemas in several countries including Germany, France and the Soviet Union. Considers films and filmmakers as manufacturers of national identities and myths both in support of and in opposition to European states in the 20th Century as a way of understanding a nation’s history. Area: Europe.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 309 Ancient Middle East

    An overview of the social, political, and cultural developments of the civilizations of the ancient Middle East, including Mesopotamia (Sumer, Akkad, and Babylonia), Egypt, Israel, Phoenicia, Asia Minor, Assyria, and Persia, and the interactions among them.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 310A Ancient Greece 1: Bronze Age to the End of the Persian Wars

    An overview of the development of the social, political, and cultural institutions of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age kingdoms of the Minoan and Mycenaean periods through the development of independent city-states in the Archaic period (particularly Sparta and Athens) and ending with the Greek victory in the Persian Wars in 479 BCE. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 310. 

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 310B Ancient Greece 2: Classical and Hellenistic Periods

    An overview of the development of the social, political, and cultural institutions of ancient Greek civilization from the “Golden Age” of Athens in the fifth century BCE, through the Peloponnesian War and the conquest of Alexander the Great, to the end of the Hellenistic period and the absorption of Greece into the Roman Empire. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 310.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 311A Ancient Rome 1: The Republic

    An overview of the development of the social, political, and cultural institutions of ancient Roman civilization from the founding of Rome, through the creation of the Republic and overseas expansion, to the dictatorship of Julius Caesar and the collapse of the Republic. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 311.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 311B Ancient Rome 2: The Empire

    An overview of the development of the social, political, and cultural institutions of ancient Roman civilization from the creation of the Empire by Augustus, through the Pax Romana and the rise of Christianity, to the “decline and fall” of the West and the creation of the Byzantine Empire in the East. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 311. 

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 312 The Ancient World in Film

    An examination of modern cinematic and television depictions of the mythology, drama, and history of ancient Greece and Rome, including the Trojan War, Alexander the Great, Cleopatra, gladiators, and early Christianity. Special emphasis is placed on understanding why the ancient world is such a popular setting for modern films, how accurately such films portray the ancient world, and how they serve as vehicles to express modern concerns and ideologies. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300M. Area: Ancient. Requirement: Pre-1800. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 313 Europe in the Middle Ages

    Explores European history from the 5th until the 14th century. Includes the Carolingian world, the Roman Catholic church, popular religion and movements of dissent, feudalism, the crusades, the formation of medieval kingdoms and city-states, and artistic and cultural patterns in the high and late middle ages.  

    Area: Europe.

    Requirement: Pre-1800. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 314 The Crusades

    Explores the evolution of the Crusades from 1095 until the conquest of Granada in 1492, with emphasis on the Christian military campaigns in the Middle East.  Themes include society and demography, trade and economy, religious and cultural encounters, intellectual exchange, military history, and colonization.  Addresses the implications of the Crusades in the modern world and contemporary events. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for Hist 300-10.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 315 Heresy, Witchcraft & Church Reform in Medival & Early Modern Europe

    Explores the rise of heretical movements, including witchcraft, and persecution by authorities in pre-modern Europe.  Focuses on historical explanations for these movements and their persecution.  Treats church authorities’ responses to the rise in heresy and witchcraft through preaching and violence.  Special attention given to the socioeconomic, cultural, gender-based, religious, and political developments that triggered these heterodox persecutions. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for Hist 300-12. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 317 Renaissance & Reformation of Europe

    Europe in the era of the Renaissance and Reformation. Explores the rise of nation states in an era of profound religious change. Examines demographic and economic transformation as well as the beginnings of European expansion. 

    Area: Europe.

    Requirement: Pre-1800. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 318 Society & Culture in Early Modern Europe

    Changes in European thought, art, and society from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Treats the development of two European cultures — elite and popular — in response to religious change. Examines literacy and printing, scientific thinking, and developments in political theory. 

    Area: Europe.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 319 Industrialization of Europe

    Economic growth and social change in 19th Century Europe. Analyzes the processes of industrialization and their relation to class formation, gender, and politics. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 320 The Age of Empire

    Explores 19th Century European imperialism and its 20th Century retreat. Focuses on competition between European states; develop­ments in colonial government and administration; effects of contacts with non-Europeans on European culture and society; and independence/ liberation movements. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 321 Nationalism and Unification in Europe

    Explores the movements for unification and national recognition in 19th and 20th Century Europe. Includes the unification of Germany and Italy, the dismantling of the Austro-Hungarian empire, movements for indepen­dence in eastern Europe. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 322 Interwar Europe 1918-1939

    Political, economic, and cultural/artistic responses to WWI in Europe. Explores the attraction of totalitarian political ideologies, the aftermath of the Paris Peace Conference, economic upheaval in the Great Depression, and the coming of WWII. Subjects include the rise of Nazism, the Spanish Civil War, Modernist movements in thought and the arts, the rise of Stalinism, and peace and appeasement. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 323 Society and Culture in Modern Europe

    Changes in European thought, art, and society from the rise of romanticism to post-modernism. Area: Europe. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 324 The Enlightenment and European Society

    Examines the tumultuous and world-changing ideas of the Enlightenment of 18th Century Europe. Looks at challenges to traditional views of religion, knowledge, politics, gender and peoples on other continents.

     Area: Europe.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 325 Revolutionary Europe

    Examines revolutionary movements in modern European history, from the French Revolution of 1789 to the overthrow of communism in Eastern Europe in 1989. Examines what distinguishes “successful” revolutions from “failed” ones, and looks at the role of ideas, economic interests, and gender in the making of each revolution. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 326 Europe Since 1945

    Political, economic, and social developments in contemporary western Europe since the end of World War II. Themes include European relations with the United States and issues of "americanization"; political and economic integration and rivalry; terrorist, radical and youth movements since the 1960s; demographic trends and issues of immigration/multiculturalism. 

    Area: Europe.

  • HIST 327 Women in Modern Europe

    The experience of women in Europe from the 17th Century to the present. Themes include changes in the definition of women’s roles, legal and political status, education, with attention to the impact of industrialization, the cult of womanhood, war, state family and welfare policies on women’s lives. Meets major requirements in women’s history. 

    Area: Europe.  

    Requirement: Gender.

  • HIST 330 The Constitution & American Society

    Origins and writing of the U.S. Constitution and the political and social issues that have arisen as the Supreme Court and others have interpreted, amended, and implemented the basic law of the United States. Area: U.S. Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD"
  • HIST 332 Women in the United States

    The changing roles and status of women from the colonial period to the present. Explores the way women and society have continuously redefined work, family, law, education, and political activity. Meets major requirements in women’s history. 

    Area: U.S.  

    Requirement: Gender.

  • HIST 333 British Empire in the Americas, 1497-1775

    Examines the creation of the British empire in the Americas from a global perspective, exploring its impact on populations, societies, and politics in the Americas, Africa, and England. Makes comparisons with the process of empire-building in Latin America and Franco-America. 

    Area: U.S.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 334 Foundations of the African-American Experience

    The experience of African-Americans in American society from the colonial period to 1865. Includes an investigation into African heritage, the middle passage, antebellum African-American culture, enslavement, the struggle against slavery, the position of free blacks, and emancipation.

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 335 The African American Struggle for Equality

    A survey of the development of traditional and legal segregation, the challenge provided by civil rights movements and related themes such as black separatism and nationalism. Area: U.S. Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD"
  • HIST 336A The U.S. Historical Experience: The Revolutionary Era

    Explores eighteenth century British America with a focus on the American Revolution. Looks at the Revolution’s intellectual origins in American and European thought and culture, its social and political origins, and its consequences for American culture, society, and politics through the 1790s. 

    Area: U.S.

    Requirement: Pre-1800.

  • HIST 336B The U.S. Historical Experience: United States Early Republic

    An intensive consideration of the crucial first 50 years of the United States, with particular attention to the development of key political institutions and the dramatic expansion of the national economy. Subjects include the consolidation of the two party system, the growth and limits of the federal government, developing sectionalism, early industrialization, the elaboration of the Southern slave system, and the rise of gender-based, religiously inspired reform movements. 

    Area: U.S.  

    Requirement: Gender.

  • HIST 336C The U.S. Historical Experience: The Civil War Era, 1845-1877

    Focuses on the process of division, war, and reunion from 1845 to 1877. Examines the social and economic structures of the United States in the antebellum period and the evolution of the political crisis that led to the South's secession and to civil war. Treats the Union and Confederate home fronts during the war and analyzes major military strategies and battles. Devotes a high priority to the experience of African-Americans throughout this period. Finally, it looks at the successes and failures of the efforts to reunify and reconstruct the nation in the post-Civil War years. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300A. Area: U.S.
  • HIST 336D The U.S. Historical Experience: The Progressive Era, 1884-1920

    Focuses on the "Progressive Era" in American life. A time of enormous change and development and a period that saw numerous reforms at the local, state, and national levels. Examines the major forces changing American life, such as industrialization, finance capitalism, urban growth, burgeoning immigration, trade unionism, the urban poor, and the plight of laborers, women, and minorities. Looks at the perceived loss of traditional values and the sharp conflicts between urban and rural areas. Finally, analyzes the nation's rise to become an international, military, economic, and financial power. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300B. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 336E U.S. Historical Experience: Prosperity, Depression, & War: USA from 1920-1945

    An exploration of society in the United States from 1920 to 1945. Between these years the United States moved from seemingly widespread prosperity through the Great Depression and into WWII. All of these phases induced profound changes in American society which will be monitored by examining how Americans from diverse backgrounds responded to the challenges of these eras. Covers such issues as the intolerance of the 1920s which included the "Red Scare" and a renewal of racism; the class divisions of the 1920s which became so apparent during the depression, and the impact that WWII not only had on American society as a whole, but specifically on women and minorities. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 342. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 336F U.S. Historical Experience: The United States in the Cold War Era

    A history of society and culture in the United States since World War II, with particular attention to the social movements of the period, as well as the impact of the Cold War. Focuses on the struggle of Americans from diverse backgrounds for inclusion and equality, with special attention to the links between the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, the Student Movement, the Antiwar Movement, and the Chicano Movement. Examines the backlash to multicultural inclusion in the 1980s. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 340. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 338A Modern U.S. Indian Policy

    Development of U.S. Indian policy and responses of Indian people since the imposition of the western reservation system in the nineteenth century. Considers allotment, reduction of the Indian land base, the Indian New Deal, termination, and demands for self-determination and sovereignty. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 338. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 338B Native Communities in S. California from Colonization to the 20th Century

    Students will read, consider, and discuss in detail scholarly studies in the history and ethnography of native communities in Southern California, beginning with the background of colonization (beginning in San Diego in 1769) and write a substantial research paper dealing with a specific theme. (For example, the paper might concern the experience of indige­nous women, the construction of native leadership, or the development of a specific event through time, such as the exile of the Cupeños from Kupa and Agua Caliente.) May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300J. Area: U.S.

    Requirement: Pre-1800. Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."

  • HIST 339 The American City

    The development of urban areas in the United States and their influence on American thought, life, and economic development from the colonial period to the present. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 340 Environmental History of the United States

    Considers the complex relationship between humans and the natural environment in the United States. Specific subjects include: the Native American interaction with the environment, nature’s influence on European colonization, the role of natural resources in America’s national development, the human attempt to control nature in the industrial era, the emergence of conservation and preservationist movements at the end of the nineteenth century, and the development of current environmental issues and concerns over the course of the twentieth century. May not be taken by students who have received credit for HIST 300R. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 341 Ideas in America

    The development and change of social, political, religious, and economic ideas in American History from the colonial period to the present. Area: U.S. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 342 History of Sports in the United States

    Surveys the history of organized sports in the United States, with special attention to the interaction of sports and gender, race, and economic issues. May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for HIST 300D. 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 343 Religion in the United States

    Religious traditions studied in the context of changes social, cultural, and political traditions of the United States from 1600 to the present. Area: U.S. Requirement: Gender. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 344 The American Frontier as Symbol and Myth

    The frontier as a metaphor for the hopes and fears of Europeans and Euroamericans from 1492 to the present, as seen in the works of writers, philosophers, political theorists, movie makers, historians, and others.   Area: U.S. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 345 The Immigrant Experience

    Patterns of migration to and the experience of immigrants in areas now part of the United States. Themes include the role of the family, neighborhood, church, and work; patterns of assimilation and acculturation; formation of political and social institutions; and the impact of immigration on the country.  

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 346 Development of the American Frontier

    The development of population, social institutions, resources, transportation, and markets along the moving line dividing indigenous and non-Indian societies from the beginnings of European colonization in the present-day United States to the early 20th Century.  

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 347 California History

    Beginning with the diverse native cultures of the region, the course explores the impact of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. control. Traces the origins of contemporary issues through the area’s economic development, multi-ethnic immigration, and evolving political institutions, and provides a survey of the human response to a place called "California." 

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 348 United States Film History

    Introduction to the history of film in the United States from its inception at the turn of the 20th Century to the present. Explores the many facets of U.S. film and looks at the manner in which the film industry developed during the course of the 20th Century. Looks at the evolution of film making and the manner in which film not only shaped but also reflected the historical moments in which it was born, with careful attention to the manner in which film reflects American society’s tensions over race, class, and gender.   

    Area: U.S.

    Requirement: Gender.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 349 Foreign Policy of the United States

    Foreign policy of the United States from the American revolution to the present.  

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 350 Chicana/o Experience in the Borderlands

    Examines the experience of people of Mexican descent (1840s-1980s) in the “borderlands” including territory in Mexico and the southwestern United States. Emphasizes the Chicano Movement as socio-political process that generated a distinctive interdisciplinary interpretation of history, “Chicano Studies.” A Chicano Studies approach will be used to examine three borderlands topics: labor, migration, and gender relations. Students will use historical methods to analyze a variety of historical sources.  

    Area: U.S.

  • HIST 352 Mexico, Past and Present

    Starting with the indigenous civilizations in the 16th Century, through the period of Spain’s imperial rule, the 19th Century wars of independence, the Revolution of 1910, and up to the present day, students are introduced to one of the most important and fascinating nations in the region. The evolution of economic, political, and social systems are traced with an emphasis on themes of ideology, identity, and resistance. Students practice basic historical methods in the required assignments.  Area: Latin America. Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."
  • HIST 355 Women in Latin America

    Focuses on women and gender in 19th- and 20th-Century Latin America. Students will explore the evolution of the historiography, recent research and first-hand testimonial sources. Connections between gender, race, and class will guide the discussion. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300T. Area: Latin America. Requirement: Gender.
  • HIST 356 Culture & Identity in Latin America

    Exploring indigenous, European, and African elements, this course encompasses Latin American nations which trace their origins to the Spanish and Portuguese empires. The theme of identity guides the discussion of cultural expressions in the aural, literary, plastic, and visual genres. The goal of national cultural unity contrasts with alternative notions of diversity, and the nation-state is the terrain where this cultural debate takes place. The time-period will be limited to the 19th and 20th centuries, allowing students to study contemporary cultural expressions as well as current historical analysis.  

    Area: Latin America. Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 359 A History of Brazil

    Starting with the arrival of the Portuguese in the early 16th Century through the long colonial period, independence, the Brazilian Empire, and, in the 20th Century, periods of alternating republican and military rule, this course introduces students to the fascinating experience of the other Latin America. Themes of race and economic modernization suffuse the political and cultural evolution of this nation. Syncretism in Brazilian culture and society emerges as a central theme.

    Area: Latin America

  • HIST 360 Classical Asia

    Introduces students to a selected body of classical texts from Asia, which include philosophical treatises, religious tracts and literary masterpieces that have become the intellectual foundation of Asian civilization. Focuses on culture and ideas, and helps students understand the historical and intellectual roots of contemporary Asia.  

    Area: Asia.  

    Requirement: Pre-1800

  • HIST 361 Modern East Asia

    Examines the history of East Asia since 1600 and focuses on major social, cultural, and political developments in the region. Particular attention will be paid to themes related to tradition/modernity, reform/ revolution, and nationalism/ colonialism. May not be taken by students who have received credit for HIST 300Q. Area: Asia.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 362 China and the West

    An exploration of the relations between China and Europe since the 16th Century. Special attention to internal change, religion, and economics as well as diplomacy and politics. Area: Asia.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."
  • HIST 363 Modern China

    Examines Chinese history since the 17th century. Major themes include the Manchu conquest in the 17th century, the expansion of the Qing Empire in the 18th, the encounter with the West in the 19th, the rise of nationalism and communism in the 20th, and the emergence of China as a world power in the 21st century. 

    Area: Asia. 

  • HIST 364 Image & Reality — Film and Modern Chinese History

    Examines modern Chinese history by looking at a group of selected popular films produced in that country during the last 70 years. By analyzing the images and motifs of these selected films, students will discuss the recurring themes and concerns as expressed by the Chinese filmmakers and seek connection between these visual manifestations and the nation’s modern history. 

    Area: Asia.  

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 365 Modern Japan

    Japanese History from the mid 19th Century to the present with special attention to the interplay between traditional institutions and modernization, and on the expansion of Japan. 

    Area: Asia. 

  • HIST 367 Women in China

    Survey of women's history in traditional China with an emphasis of the late imperial period (16th to 18th centuries). Students will read Western feminist theories together with historical records on Chinese women. The objectives of the class are: (1) to critically evaluate the universalistic claims of Western theories; (2) to learn how to ask new questions about Chinese women; (3) to gain an understanding of the ways Chinese women actually experienced their lives, and (4) to examine issues related to feminism and women's studies from a comparative perspective. 

    Area: Asia.  

    Requirement: Gender; Pre-1800.

  • HIST 370 Early African History

    Part I survey of African history discusses the culture expressed through the lives of the elite and the ordinary people, art and literature, and the ritual and belief systems of the African civilizations from the earliest times to 1800. Specific issues include the invention of agricultures, art and oral literature as historical records, centralization of state and urbanization and commerce, observance of religious and ritual ceremonies, and the impact of all these developments. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 270.

    Area: Africa.  

    Requirement: Pre-1800.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 371 Modern African History

    Part II survey of African history examines the political, socio-economic, and cultural issues in Africa (particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa), from 1800 to the present. Issues considered include Africa’s increasing economic and political transformation before European intrusion, colonial occupation and African resistance, African response to colonial overrule, and the coming of independence and Africa’s challenges in world affairs. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 271. 

    Area: Africa.

  • HIST 374 Africa Under European Imperialism 1880-1975

    Studies European imperialism in Africa and its political economic, and socio-cultural impact. Emphasizes the various theories about imperialism, including Marxist, dependency and modernist theories, especially pertaining to the motives, policies, and legacies of the colonial imperialist activities. 

    Area: Africa.

  • HIST 375 African Nationalism and Independence

    Explores the rise of African nationalism since the 1940s, and the course of Africa’s regaining of independence. Pays specific attention to the leading personalities in the struggle for independence and their nationalist philosophies. The political, economic and cultural challenges of African nationalism today such as disunity and conflicts, and the poor state of the economy and education, will also be examined. 

    Area: Africa.  

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."

  • HIST 379 Africa and the World in the 20th Century

    Thematic rather than chronological study of Africa and the world in the 20th century. Focuses on select global themes such as Pan-Africanism,communism, the Cold War and the United Nations organization, and explores how they have variously influenced the course of African history. 

    Area: Africa.  

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."

  • HIST 380 The Middle East, 600 to 1700 C.E.

    Explores the history of the region from the rise of Islam to the eighteenth century. Emphasizes the social and cultural background and circumstances of the rise of Islam, the formation and development of the early caliphate, the rise of Islamic successor states, the age of Ottoman and Safavid "gunpowder" empires, forms of cultural expression such as art and literature, the role of women and ethnic and religious minorities, and the integration of the Middle East into an emerging world system.

    Area: Middle East.  

    Requirement: Pre-1800

  • HIST 381 Comparative French Colonialism: From the Caribbean to Indochina

    Compares French colonialism in a variety of contexts, such as Haiti, Algeria and Vietnam. Examines the perspective of the colonizers and the colonized, using works of colonial theory, history, literature, and film. Explores the economic, cultural, political, and social aspects of colonialism French-style, from the eighteenth century to the present.

    AreaComparative/Transnational. 

  • HIST 382 Travel and Contact in the Early Modern World

    Examines encounters between people from different cultures in the early modern period (Approximately 1500-1800). Students will read travel and captivity narratives, along with scholarly analyses of travel and of intercultural contact. Focuses on how cultural differences were regarded and managed by different peoples and different states. 

    AreaComparative/Transnational.  

    Requirement: Gender; Pre-1800.  Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 383 Women and Jewish History

    What was it like to be both a woman and a member of a minority group, in the diverse locales where Jews have lived? Examines the experiences of Jews in various parts of the world by focusing on the lives of women, using several historical case studies. Also covers important themes and changes affecting Jewish history, such as religious tradition, emancipation, assimilation, anti-Semitism, immigration, Zionism, the Holocaust and feminism. 

    AreaComparative/Transnational.  

    Requirement: Gender.

  • HIST 384 Women & Gender in the Middle East

    Examines the history of women and gender in the region from the rise of Islam to the present. Emphasizes historiographical approaches; the roles of women in early Islamic societies and later empires; issues concerning class, ethnicity, and religion; work, marriage, and family; colonialism, nationalism, and modernity; and women’s participation in twentieth-century social and political movements. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300F. Meets major require­ments in women’s history. 

    Area: Comparative/Transnational.  

    Requirement: Gender

  • HIST 385 The Middle East, 1700-Present

    Explores the history of the region from the eighteenth century to the present. Begins with the question of imperial decline and investigates the cultural and political responses of Middle Eastern societies to the challenges of European colonialism and imperialism, the emergence of nationalism, nation-state building, and modern social, political, intellectual, and religious movements. Emphasis on the historical background and development of contemporary issues, such as revolution, Islamism, women's rights, and globalization.

    Area: Middle East

  • HIST 386 Haiti & World History

    Covers Haitian history from Columbus’s arrival to the present. Studies Haiti under French colonialism, during the Haitian Revolution, and after independence. Focuses on the multiple challenges that Haiti faced after independence, from internal struggles to international hostility. Gives special attention to Haiti in the twenty-first century and to issues of globalization and development. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for HIST 300-6.  

    AreaComparative/Transnational.

  • HIST 387 History of the United Nations

    Focuses on the creation and development of the United Nations as an international actor since 1945. Includes: UN as successor to League of Nations; creation of UN and UN system; development of UN missions (e.g., peacekeeping, human rights); the international Cold War; interna­tional politics of de-colonization and the Non-Aligned movement. Provides a critical examination of analysis of the claims and behavior of the UN over time. 

    AreaComparative/Transnational.

  • HIST 388 History of War in Modern Society

    War has been one of the greatest agents of change in world history, and it has shaped irrevocably the world in which we live. This course explores modern war and the idea of war since the late 18th Century and focuses on the transition in the 20th Century to the realities of both "total" wars and "world" wars; considers the role of war in modern state-building, in social movements and institutions, and in intellectual and artistic expression. An important aspect involves a consideration of the intellectual, philosophical and cultural history of war, including the development of the ethics of war in an international context. This is not a course in military history. 

    AreaComparative/Transnational.  

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "CC."

  • HIST 390 Science & Technology in the U.S. History

    Considers the interaction of science and technology with the historical development of the United States, from Franklin's experiments with electricity to the computer revolution in Silicon Valley, including discussions of the impact of Darwinism, the influence of electrical, communication, and transportation systems on our society, and the innovations in physics, biochemistry and earth science that shape our weaponry, our medicine, and our interaction with the environment.

    Area: U.S.  

    Meets upper-division general education requirement "DD."

  • HIST 393 (1 unit) Experiential Learning for Future Teachers

    Prepares prospective history teachers through independent study, directed readings, and experiential learning under the guidance of an instructor, with special emphasis on using technology in the history classroom. Requires minimum of 35 hours teaching experience. Several short analytical papers required.

    Enrollment Requirement: Restricted to Social Science Waiver Program students who have received consent of instructor.

    EDUC 350 is a recommended corequisite.

  • HIST 394 History and Geographic Information Systems

    Investigates how geographic information systems can strengthen analysis of historical events. Learn how to use GIS software and the mapping of information to understand the history of immigration, urbanization, business, and popular culture.
  • HIST 398A (1 unit) 398B (2 unit) 398C (3 unit) Independent Study

    Directed readings under the guidance of an instructor. Several short analytical papers required. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor and discipline advisor.
  • HIST 400 Seminar in European History

    An intensive look at selected areas of European History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 430 Seminar in United States History

    An intensive look at selected areas of United States History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 440 Seminar in Latin American History

    An intensive look at selected areas of Latin American History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 450 Seminar in African History

    An intensive look at selected areas of African History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 460 Seminar in World History

    An intensive look at selected areas of World History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 470 Seminar in Asian History

    An intensive look at selected areas of Asian History. A capstone course for history majors in which they draw from their previous work and write a paper focusing on their primary theme.

    Prerequisites: HIST 301.

  • HIST 495A (1 unit) 495B (2 units) 495C (3 units) Internship

    On-site work for a historical agency such as an archive or museum, or providing historical research for a business or public agency. Requires assigned readings in theory and historical background, and a sustained project. May be repeated for a total of three (3) units. Arranged upon request through the History discipline.

    Prerequisites: Fifteen (15) units of upper-division History work, and consent of supervising faculty and discipline advisor.

  • HIST 499 Independent Research

    Development of an extended research paper using primary and secondary sources in consultation with a faculty advisor.

    Enrollment Requirement: Fifteen (15) units of upper-division History work including HIST 301. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor and discipline advisor.


Graduate Courses

  • HIST 501 Historical Perspectives on Media

     Explores the history of media communication and popular culture as well as the relationship between the change in media over time and the messages that they convey.

    Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.

  • HIST 502 History and Applied Media Technology

    Introduction to various techniques in applying media technology to present historical research and interpretation. May include, but is not limited to, online instructional techniques, web-based archival preservation or museum presentations, multimedia presentations of historical findings and video presentations of historical topics.

    Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.

  • HIST 510 Experiential Learning in Public History

    Introduction to the field of public history, combining graduate level training in the theory and methods of public history with a minimum of 30 hours of an internship in a field placement. This course will consider issues in archival techniques, museum exhibition, oral history, historical preservation and local history. May be repeated for a total of six (6)units.

    Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.

  • HIST 512 Teaching History: Theory and Practice

    Introduction to the issues and techniques involved in the effective teaching of history at all levels. The course will cover the historical context of history teaching; major themes in world and U.S. history; and methods that teachers can use to involve students in actively learning about the past. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of technology in the classroom. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 513A (1 unit) 513B (2 units) 513C (3 units) History Teaching Practicum

    Practical applications of teaching history in the college or university classroom for graduate teaching assistants.

    Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

    Graded Credit/No Credit.

  • HIST 518 Advanced Seminar in Ancient History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in Ancient History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change.

    Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.

  • HIST 528 Advanced Seminar in European History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research in the historical literature of a topic in European History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 538 Advanced Seminar in United States History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in United States History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll. undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change.
  • HIST 558 Advanced Seminar in Latin American History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in Latin American History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 568 Advanced Seminar in Asian History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in Asian History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 578 Advanced Seminar in African History

    Examination of the dominant historiographical themes and issues and advanced research on a topic in African history. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 588 Advanced Seminar in Middle Eastern History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in Middle Eastern History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 591 Advanced Seminar in World History

    Exploration of primary and secondary sources and advanced research on a topic in World History. Advanced undergraduates interested in taking this course should consult the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of twelve (12) units as topics change. Enrollment restricted to graduate students; advanced undergraduates need consent of instructor to enroll.
  • HIST 595 The Philosophy and Practice of History

    Readings in the nature of historical inquiry and methodological issues. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.
  • HIST 599 Directed Readings in American History

    Individual or small group exploration of the historical literature of a particular field through reading, discussion, and writing. May be repeated for up to nine (9) units. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.
  • HIST 601 The Philosophy and Practice of History

    Exploration of the nature of historical inquiry, including historiography, different genres of history, and methods of research used in advanced historical writing. Introduction to core philosophical debates abouthistorical methods and to texts exemplifying different kinds of historical writing. Students must earn a grade of B (3.0) or higher to apply toward a Master’s degree in History. May be repeated for a total of six (6)units. Only three (3) units may be applied toward the Master’s degree in History. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Arts in History Program, or to other graduate students who have obtained consent of instructor.
  • HIST 620 Directed Thesis Research, Writing, & Media Presentation

    Faculty supervision of the research and writing of the thesis project and/or development of the media presentation of research findings. Graduate students who have completed 18 units or more toward the
    M.A. in History degree and are working on their thesis proposal or their final thesis/digital history project must remain continuously enrolled in this course. May be repeated up to seven times, but only six (6) units may be applied to the M.A. in History degree. Graded Credit/No Credit. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Prerequisite: HIST 601 with a grade of B (3.0) or higher.
  • HIST 699A (1 unit) 699B (2 units) 699C (3 units) Independent Study in Advanced Historical

    Intensive independent study of advanced historical issues based on secondary and/or primary sources. May be repeated, but only six (6) units may be applied toward the Master of Arts in History degree.